Defiance-FirstVideoGameTVShow-Feb2013

 

Excerpt:

It’s not unusual for a science fiction television show to spin off a video game. What is unusual is linking the show and the game together on an ongoing basis, with plot elements and characters from each crossing over to the other. In April, gaming company Trion Worlds and the Syfy cable television channel will unveil Defiance, the first such crossover massively multiplayer online game (MMO) and TV show.

 

From DSC:

Transmedia.

Multimedia.

Interactivity.

Participation.

Gamification.

Sounds like there must be something here for the next gen of learners — and learning from the living room.

 

 

Also see:

A seat at the table at lastfrom campustechnology.com by Andrew Barbour
One result of the Year of the MOOC is that IT is finally getting a say in the strategic direction of the institution.

Excerpt:

It’s interesting that it took an external force to propel IT into this inner circle. I can’t recall how many stories CT has run proposing strategies for how CIOs could win a place at the table. At the end of the day, though, changing an institution as hidebound as the average college is not easily tackled from within. In contrast, there’s nothing like a little existential angst to shake things up.

But MOOCs aren’t the only drivers of this change. We often think of BYOD as stripping IT of control but–on the broader stage–it may be playing its own part in elevating IT’s profile on campus. For years, faculty resisted IT recommendations on how technology could improve teaching and learning. Saying no was easy–preserving the status quo always is. That’s changing now. BYOD is a force that faculty can’t resist. It is, after all, their customers bringing the devices to school. Suddenly, faculty are faced with demands for new styles of teaching that accommodate student preferences for technology and much more. Enter IT and a host of others who see the potential of tech in education.

Also relevant/see:

  • The University’s Dilemma– from strategy-business.com by Tim Laseter; with thanks to Ross Dawson for the recent tweet on this

TheFutureOfWork-Jan2013

 

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TheFutureOfWork2-Jan2013

 

 

learningbydoing-futureofwork-2013

 

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From DSC:

  • Note the need for being tech-savvy here — the more familiarity our students have with videoconferencing, web-based collaborating tools, tapping into streams of content, etc., the better things will go for them in their future careers.
    .
  • Note also the need for constant, lifelong learning. 
  • Note the possibility that we might be heading more towards online-based exchanges and marketplaces — and that includes teaching and learning.

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The Power of Online Exchanges

 

Re: the idea of exchanges:

 

Also see the following items from Genius:

  • The New Consumer Agenda:
    From authentic collaboration to small indulgences … what consumers want in 2013 and beyond, and how brands are responding.
  • Marketing Trends 2013+:
    From black marketing to crowd creatives, brand gaming to urban formats, solomo and diffusion … what will be big in marketing in 2013

 

Additional notes from DSC:

  • With thanks going out to Mr. Jim Woods (@hyperinnovation) on twitter for this resource
  • The wave-related graphics above are very appropriate for our times — and I’d rather be surfing the waves then being crushed by them!

 

 

All Together Now:
Bring two powerful generations together: change the story to change the world!

Excerpt of email I rec’d:

Whatever future we face, it’s going to require all of our stories. All Together Now was created to bridge two generations that aren’t often in dialogue. With our partners, The Future Project (high school students based on the East Coast) and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (active elders based on the West Coast), participants will portray their own journeys out of silence, standing to lift their voices in community. Please donate today. There’s a great list of perks for contributors, but the best one of all is knowing that when we ask some urgent questions—Whose story counts? Whose story gets heard?—The answer has to be everyone. Your support for All Together Now will put that answer into practice.

 

Exploring the field of tech for engagement — from knightfoundation.org by Damian Thorman; with a special thanks going out to Sue Ellen Christian for this find/resource

Excerpt:

Knight Foundation launched its Tech for Engagement Initiative two years ago because we believe technology has the power to transform our democracy.

In big and small ways, we see the potential for reinventing citizens’ relationships with their neighbors, leaders and governments, as a way to build the informed and engaged communities where we all want to live.

Since then, Knight has invested $10 million in two dozen projects, with some early successes. I think most readily of Community PlanIt, which helped the Boston Public Schools involve more people, more deeply in planning efforts.

Latitude looking to kids for technology innovation — from technapex.com by Caity Doyle

 

 

Excerpt:

On their website, Latitude explains why they made the interesting choice to reach out to children for new ideas in technology:

Young people shouldn’t be merely passive recipients of media and technology, as they’re often thought to be — rather, they should be active participants in imagining and creating the future of the Web. Why? Because “digital natives” have a more intuitive relationship with new technologies than many adults have, and because they have different expectations about technology. They instinctively expect it to respond to them in very human-like ways — to motivate and empower them, often serving as a sort of companion, rather than merely a tool for solving specific problems.

Maximizing Millennials: The who, how, and why of managing Gen Y — from onlinemba.unc.edu posted by jherbst

 
Gen Y In the Workplace Via MBA@UNC
Via MBA@UNC Online Business Degree & The YEC

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The new workplace — from internettime.com by Jay Cross

Excerpt (emphasis by DSC):

Six years ago few people believed that informal learning made much of a difference. Today’s common wisdom is that most workplace learning is experiential, unplanned, social, and informal.

Informal learning tops many training department agendas. Companies are attracted by the low price tag. However, few of them are doing much systematically. They’ve converted a few programs but they’ve failed to improve their learning ecosystems.

We’ve shifted how we think about learning since the Informal Learning book came out. It’s a new ball game and we need to play by new rules. Consider what’s changed…

From DSC:
If this is the case, what could/should that mean for those of us working within higher education?

7 billion -- from the National Geographic Society

Also see:

 

 

 

WorkTech11 West Coast: A report from the trenches — from thefutureofwork.net by Jim Ware

Headings/excerpt:

  • Randy Knox
  • Nokia Silicon Valley
  • Hamid Shirvani, President California State University, Stanislaus
  • Urban Design: Panel Debate
  • Kevin Kelly, author, “What Technology Wants”
  • Nathan Waterhouse, Ideo
  • Marie Puybaraud, Johnson Controls, and Sudhakar Lahade, Steelcase
  • Vwork: Michael Leone, Regus, and Philip Ross, CEO Unwired and the Cordless Group
  • Rational Mobility:  Kevin Kelly, GSA (The “Other” Kevin Kelly)
  • Going Mobile: Dawn Birkett, Salesforce.com and Bryant Rice, DEGW
  • Mobility and Virtual Work:  Panel Debate

 

From Daniel Christian: Fasten your seatbelts! An accelerated ride through some ed-tech landscapes.


From DSC:
Immediately below is a presentation that I did for the Title II Conference at Calvin College back on August 11, 2011
It is aimed at K-12 audiences.


 

Daniel S. Christian presentation -- Fasten your seatbelts! An accelerated ride through some ed-tech landscapes (for a K-12 audience)

 


From DSC:
Immediately below is a presentation that I did today for the Calvin College Fall 2011 Conference.
It is aimed at higher education audiences.


 

 Daniel S. Christian presentation -- Fasten your seatbelts! An accelerated ride through some ed-tech landscapes (for a higher ed audience)

 


Note from DSC:

There is a great deal of overlap here, as many of the same technologies are (or will be) hitting the K-12 and higher ed spaces at the same time. However, there are some differences in the two presentations and what I stressed depended upon my audience.

Pending time, I may put some audio to accompany these presentations so that folks can hear a bit more about what I was trying to relay within these two presentations.


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