How to get a job — by Thomas L. Friedman

Excerpt (emphasis DSC):

Underneath the huge drop in demand that drove unemployment up to 9 percent during the recession, there’s been an important shift in the education-to-work model in America. Anyone who’s been looking for a job knows what I mean. It is best summed up by the mantra from the Harvard education expert Tony Wagner that the world doesn’t care anymore what you know; all it cares “is what you can do with what you know.” And since jobs are evolving so quickly, with so many new tools, a bachelor’s degree is no longer considered an adequate proxy by employers for your ability to do a particular job — and, therefore, be hired. So, more employers are designing their own tests to measure applicants’ skills. And they increasingly don’t care how those skills were acquired: home schooling, an online university, a massive open online course, or Yale. They just want to know one thing: Can you add value?

People get rejected for jobs for two main reasons, said Sharef. One, “you’re not showing the employer how you will help them add value,” and, two, “you don’t know what you want, and it comes through because you have not learned the skills that are needed.” The most successful job candidates, she added, are “inventors and solution-finders,” who are relentlessly “entrepreneurial” because they understand that many employers today don’t care about your résumé, degree or how you got your knowledge, but only what you can do and what you can continuously reinvent yourself to do.

.

From DSC:

So how about it? Are the students coming out of K-12 and higher ed prepared for this changing workplace? If not, how can we better prepare them? It seems to me we should require that each student create their own business — and help them build it before they graduate.  It doesn’t matter if that business makes any money at all.  What matters is the learning/experiences that the students would gain.

Also, to folks in the corporate world, help us get students to the places you need them to be — and stop expecting the”purple unicorns” to show up at your doorstep.  Adjust your expectations and aim for a higher purpose than pleasing the shareholder/Wall Street.

Game changers + kids — from live.huffingtonpost.com

Excerpt:

What happens when you bring business innovators together with today’s youth? Choose2Matter is about to find out. We talk to the people behind Choose2Matter and leaders of the business world about the power of the idea that everyone matters.

 

Also see:

.

Choose2Matter-May2013

WhyLeanStartUpChangesEverything-SteveBlank-May2013

 

Excerpt (emphasis DSC):

But recently an important countervailing force has emerged, one that can make the process of starting a company less risky. It’s a methodology called the “lean start-up,” and it favors experimentation over elaborate planning, customer feedback over intuition, and iterative design over traditional “big design up front” development. Although the methodology is just a few years old, its concepts—such as “minimum viable product” and “pivoting”—have quickly taken root in the start-up world, and business schools have already begun adapting their curricula to teach them.

From DSC:
This fits into my thinking/recommendation that each institution of higher education should create a much smaller, more nimble group within itself — whose goal is to experiment, pivot, adapt, etc. — in order to find out what’s working and what’s not working.  It’s why I have categories and tags for words like “experimentation,” “staying relevant,” “reinvent,” “innovation,” “surviving,” and “disruption.”

The trick is/will be how NOT to be a commodity –what’s going to differentiate your college or university?

 

 

 

 

For Ivy League grads, tech trumps Wall Street — from SmartPlanet.com by Kirsten Korosec

Excerpt:

A wave of young professionals–as well as recent grads–are bypassing (or leaving) Wall Street to take jobs within the high-tech sector, reported the Wall Street Journal. Nowhere is this trend more evident than in New York City, where employments in securities and banking fell 10 percent to 163,600 jobs in the past five years. Over the same time period, high-tech employments rose 10 percent to 275,600 by mid-2010, according to data from the New York State Department of Labor, reported the WSJ.

 

40 years coming, the revolution is here — from gettingsmart.com by Tom Vander Ark

Excerpt:

Moe sees learners creating a “personalized knowledge portfolio,” an unbundled sequence of learning experiences from multiple providers.

Moe sees an innovation ecosystem emerging, and calls it KaizenEDU. In this emerging ecosystem, it’s the “return on education” that matters. Moe argues the entrepreneurs that help create great learning gains are the ones that will create great shareholder value.

Healthcare gives us a picture of what that could mean for edtech. In 1970 there were 3 companies worth more than $1 billion. Last year, health care made up 13% of U.S. GDP and there were 398 companies with a market cap of more than $1 billion. Education is about 9% of GDP but there are only 5 public companies worth more than $1 billion. The difference is a result of dramatic under investment in R&D, but that’s changing!

The three emerging areas requiring more attention, according to Shelton, are early learning tools and resources, summer and out of school learning, and course redesign in higher education.

All Together Now:
Bring two powerful generations together: change the story to change the world!

Excerpt of email I rec’d:

Whatever future we face, it’s going to require all of our stories. All Together Now was created to bridge two generations that aren’t often in dialogue. With our partners, The Future Project (high school students based on the East Coast) and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (active elders based on the West Coast), participants will portray their own journeys out of silence, standing to lift their voices in community. Please donate today. There’s a great list of perks for contributors, but the best one of all is knowing that when we ask some urgent questions—Whose story counts? Whose story gets heard?—The answer has to be everyone. Your support for All Together Now will put that answer into practice.

 

 

From DSC:
Starting immediately, all traditional and non-traditional institutions of education should develop this type of program — and more — and integrate such programs into their offerings/curriculum.  The targets are simply moving too fast.  As such, students need to know how to constantly pulse check a variety of landscapes, develop scenarios/strategies, and then execute on those strategies.  Given the pace of change, don’t expect to bat a thousand.

Reminds me of this graphic I created back in 2009:

 

 

To further support this perspective, check out the #1 item from Educause’s Learning Initiative (ELI) below:

.

ELI Anchor Survey Results


From DSC:

I’ve been trying to figure out the best ways to incorporate a BYOD/BYOT into the Smart Classroom.  That is, how can students’ devices seamlessly communicate with the main displays around the classroom? How can they quickly display a blog posting or a Google doc for example…or play a song they wrote, etc.  So I was excited to wake up this morning with the following concept/idea:


 

The Internet of Things Ceiling -- A concept for our future Smart Classrooms by Daniel Christian in December 2012

.

The Internet of Things Ceiling -- concept by Daniel Christian -  December 2012

.

.

Other features/thoughts:

  • Line of sight communications — students must be in the room to display something up on the main displays
  • Information travels many ways:  From large multitouch displays/walls to students’ devices and vice versa; so a professor could hit “Save” in order to send his/her annotations to all of the students’ devices (allowing them to be more cognitively present — vs madly writing down what the professor is writing)
  • The Smart Classroom’s infrastructure becomes like a multi-thredded processor — instantaneously and simultaneously handling a far greater amount of data — going in multiple directions
  • What’s an interesting idea here is for discipline-specific, cloud-based storage mechanisms for students who want to contribute their pieces of content to their schools repositories of content
  • This topic reminds me of a graphic I created a while back, re: The “Chalkboard” of the Future:

 

 

 

So…what if the 4 screen’s on Julong’s Ultra-IPBOARD were coming from 4 different sources? Perhaps:

  1. One from a publisher’s cloud-based content repository
  2. Another from a stream of content originating from a student’s iPad
  3. Another from a stream of content originating from the Smart Classroom’s PC or Mac
  4. …and the last source originating from a student’s smartphone?

 

Demo for Ultra-IPBOARD

 

Also see:

.

 

.

 

Along these lines of innovation/experimentation (but this time within higher education):

Book description:

Wired magazine editor and bestselling author Chris Anderson takes you to the front lines of a new industrial revolution as today’s entrepreneurs, using open source design and 3-D printing, bring manufacturing to the desktop.  In an age of custom-fabricated, do-it-yourself product design and creation, the collective potential of a million garage tinkerers and enthusiasts is about to be unleashed, driving a resurgence of American manufacturing.  A generation of “Makers” using the Web’s innovation model will help drive the next big wave in the global economy, as the new technologies of digital design and rapid prototyping gives everyone the power to invent — creating “the long tail of things”.

Also see:

.

3d Printing by Freedom of Creation Monarch Stools in situ How 3D Printing is Disrupting Mainstream Manufacturing Processes

 

Startup Open recognizes 50 promising new startups — from unleashingideas.org by Mark Marich (GEW global)

 

speedlimit_top_50.jpg

.

Excerpt:

In the search to find some of the best and brightest new startups around the world, Global Entrepreneurship Week recently announced the “GEW 50” —a list of the 50 most innovative new companies competing in the Startup Open, a competition that recognizes startups with high-growth potential. These elite ventures will now vie for the grand prize—an all-expenses-paid trip to Rio de Janeiro to serve as an official delegate to one of the world’s largest gatherings of startup champions, the Global Entrepreneurship Congress, in March 2013.

Selected out of a field of nearly 400 applicants, the GEW 50 represent a range of industry sectors—from cleantech and life sciences to agriculture and transportation—and hail from 17 countries. The 50 were judged on concept, growth projections and knowledge of their industry. Each of the competing startups was required to have a “startup moment” between GEW 2011 and GEW 2012 (Nov. 22, 2011 to Nov. 18, 2012). A “startup moment” is anything that can be interpreted as the company is “open for business,” such as becoming incorporated, completing a first sale or securing outside funding.

Tagged with:  

Why education is the right direction for tech entrepreneurs -- by Harrison Kratz -- 9-26-12

The Washington Monthly - The Magazine - The Siege of Academe [Kevin Carey]

Excerpt:

The ongoing carnage in the newspaper industry provides an object lesson of what can happen when a long-established, information-focused industry’s business model is challenged by low-price competitors online. The disruptive power of information technology may be our best hope for curing the chronic college cost disease that is driving a growing number of students into ruinous debt or out of higher education altogether. It may also be an existential threat to institutions that have long played a crucial role in American life.

.

From DSC:
If higher ed doesn’t respond more forcefully/significantly to the perfect storm it finds itself in, people will find other ways of getting employed and staying employed. The conversation continues to move away from institutions of traditional higher education (here’s but one example). Control is an illusion.

Transforming scientists into entrepreneurs– from Inc.com by Steve Blank
Our nation’s research labs hold a wealth of untapped innovation. But how do you bridge the gap between science and start-up?

Also see:

Excerpt:
Colleges are starting to become startup incubators by offering a variety of classes and programs in order to help students pursue their entrepreneurial ambitions. This is good news for students because employers feel that they should gain entrepreneurship experience before graduating. Many professors are current or former entrepreneurs who act as mentors to students and teach them critical marketing, sales, and operation skills.

Students from entrepreneurship programs are creating their own future through their companies instead of having to apply to jobs.

Tagged with:  

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!

© 2019 | Daniel Christian