AR and VR in STEM: The New Frontiers in Science  — from er.educause.edu by Emory Craig and Maya Georgieva

Excerpt:

Virtual and Augmented Reality are poised to profoundly transform the STEM curriculum. In this article, we offer several inspiring examples and key insights on the future of immersive learning and the sciences. Immersive technologies will revolutionize learning through experiential simulations, modelling and spatial representation of data, and a sense of presence in contextual gamification.

Understanding our place in the universe, building the next Martian Rover, designing new transportation systems, fostering sustainable communities, modeling economic stability — finding the solution for these pressing and interconnected challenges brings us to STEM and STEAM in teaching and learning. The movement behind STEAM advocates incorporating the arts and humanities to the science, technology, engineering and math curriculum.

 

 

Also see:

 

 

 

EdTech magazine covers the latest news and discussions, live from ISTE 2017 in San Antonio, Texas.

 

 

 

ISTE 2017: 6 New Products Unveiled on the Show Floor — from edtechmagazine.com by Jena Passut
New offerings from big tech companies highlight this year’s megaconference in San Antonio.

Excerpt:

With more than 18,000 attendees and plenty of press coverage, the annual ISTE’s 2017 Conference & Expo has become a prime place for vendors to launch new products and announce updates. This year is no different. Check out some of the latest offerings announced at the 2017 event, and then head over to EdTech’s coverage page to read and see more news from ISTE.

 

 



Also see:



 

 

 

Summer 2017 Human++ — fromcambridge.nuvustudio.com
Human-Machine Intelligence, Hacking Drones, Bio Fashion, Augmented Video Games, Aerial Filmmaking, Smart Tools, Soft Robotics and more!

Excerpt:

NuVu is a place where young students grow their spirit of innovation. They use their curiosity and creativity to explore new ideas, and make their concepts come to life through our design process. Our model is based on the architecture studio model, and every Summer we use imaginative themes to frame two-week long Studios in which students dive into hands-on design, engineering, science, technology, art and more!

 

 

Highlights from the 2016 Flipped Classroom Conference — from Harvey Mudd Colleg, with a special thanks to Calvin College Engineering Professor Jeremy VanAntwerp for this resource

 

 

 

 

Optimizing the Flipped STEM Class:  Higher Ed Tools, Contexts, and Assessments
This one-time conference for faculty in the STEM disciplines at 2- and 4-year higher education institutions focused on tools, contexts, and assessments relating to flipped classrooms. What techniques, strategies, and tools use flipped classroom pedagogy to improve student learning outcomes? What does the research say about the different contexts and environments in which flipped instruction will lead to optimal results? How do we measure whether our efforts are producing the best student learning? The conference was designed for those who are new to flipped classrooms and to those who are current practitioners and want to improve outcomes. Participate had plenty of opportunities to share with each other in a small conference setting.

The conference took place from January 11 to 12 at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, CA. Limited funding for travel and lodging for U.S. residents was available. This conference was generously funded by the National Science Foundation (DUE 1244786) and Harvey Mudd College.

 

Robot Launch 2016 – Robohub Readers’ Pick round one — from robohub.org by Andra Keay

Excerpt:

For the next three weeks, Robohub readers can vote for their “Readers’ Pick” startup from the Robot Launch competition. Each week, we’ll be publishing 10 videos. Our ultimate Robohub Readers’ Favorites, along with lots of other prizes, will be announced at the end of November. Every week we’ll showcase different aspects of robotics startups and their business models: from agricultural to humanoid, from consumer to industrial and from hardware to robotics software. Make sure you vote for your favorite – below – by 18:00pm UTC, Wednesday 9 November, spread the word through social media using #robotlaunch2016 and come back next week for the next 10!

 

 

LEGO® MINDSTORMS® Education EV3 Classroom Solutions — from education.lego.com

Excerpt:

Students develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills in middle school. LEGO MINDSTORMS Education EV3 grows these 21st century skills through inquiry-based and active learning.

lego-nov2016

 

 

Vex Robotics

 

vexrobotics-nov2016

 

 

No need to stare at a screen: Kickstarter robot teaches kids to code using cards — from digitaltrends.com by Luke Dormehl

 

 

 

 



Addendums:

 



 

 

Preparing for the future of Artificial Intelligence
Executive Office of the President
National Science & Technology Council
Committee on Technology
October 2016

preparingfor-futureai-usgov-oct2016

Excerpt:

As a contribution toward preparing the United States for a future in which AI plays a growing role, this report surveys the current state of AI, its existing and potential applications, and the questions that are raised for society and public policy by progress in AI. The report also makes recommendations for specific further action s by Federal agencies and other actors. A companion document lays out a strategic plan for Federally-funded research and development in AI. Additionally, in the coming months, the Administration will release a follow-on report exploring in greater depth the effect of AI-driven automation on jobs and the economy.

The report was developed by the NSTC’s Subcommittee on Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence, which was chartered in May 2016 to foster interagency coordination, to provide technical and policy advice on topics related to AI, and to monitor the development of AI technologies across industry, the research community, and the Federal Government. The report was reviewed by the NSTC Committee on Technology, which concurred with its contents. The report follows a series of public-outreach activities spearheaded by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in 2016, which included five public workshops co-hosted with universities and other associations that are referenced in this report.

In the coming years, AI will continue to contribute to economic growth and will be a valuable tool for improving the world, as long as industry, civil society, and government work together to develop the positive aspects of the technology, manage its risks and challenges, and ensure that everyone has the opportunity to help in building an AI-enhanced society and to participate in its benefits.

 

 

 

50+ Resources for STEAM

50+ Resources for STEAM — from steamconnect.org

One of the sites mentioned, was Wonderville:

 

wonderville-spet2016

 

 

 

15 best tips for young engineers — from interestingengineering.com

Excerpt:

The proverb goes hindsight is 20/20, which essentially means you can make better decisions later on when you have become more knowledgeable about the worldBut wouldn’t it be nice to be able to make good decisions from the outset when you’re still young? The following tips were compiled for young engineers and interestingly, most of these suggestions revolve around lifelong learning. Experienced engineers weighed in and added their voice to help create this top 15 list of the best tips for young engineers.

 

 

10 great initiatives that bring girls into STEM — from interestingengineering.com

Excerpt:

It is not a secret that science and engineering professions are occupied mainly by men with only about 20% taken by females. The number of women on executive boards is also extremely low. In order to succeed, both female and male minds are needed for any kind of jobs, especially in science-related industries. Let’s see what initiatives already exist in order to bring more girls and women into STEM!

 

 

MakerBot teams up with Future Engineers to support the Star Trek (TM) Replicator Challenge for K-12 students — from makerbot.com

Excerpt:

MakerBot is excited to inspire the next generation of astronauts and Starfleet cadets by supporting the Star Trek Replicator Challenge, a 3D printing challenge developed by Future Engineers for the ASME Foundation, NASA and Star Trek. Participants in the challenge must create a digital model of a non-edible, food-related item for astronauts to 3D print in the year 2050. The Star Trek Replicator Challenge is the third in a series of ‘Future Engineers’ challenges aimed to educate students K-12 about 3D printing and engineering design.

 

 

 

Excerpt from the Learning Spaces Collaboratory Roundtable | Spring 2016: Focusing on the Future of Planning Learning Spaces | Boston University

Also see this PDF file.


Driving Questions

  1. How can we promote active learning environments—in classrooms and in teaching labs? What does it take to promote small group peer-to-peer interaction and learning?
  2. How can spaces promote investigative, cross-disciplinary problem-based learning and problem-solving?
  3. What does a ‘technology-rich’ learning environment mean? What are the tools needed in learning spaces to prepare students for increasing technology-dependent careers. How many ways and places can technologies be used in a facility to serve the campus community as well as to support outreach beyond the campus?
  4. In our planning, how can we exploit opportunities for sharing, breaking down departmental silos? How can we maximize the use of flexible or case method classrooms, student study, break-out space, and shared administrative space? Does it work to distribute disciplines throughout the building rather than to cluster them by floor? What needs to be next to what?
  5. How can a goal of increasing lower division student success in STEM disciplines be addressed in the planning process? What does it take to attract students to these fields and motivate them to persist? How do we create a supportive environment conducive to success?
  6. How do our spaces reflect the social nature of learning, the need for collegiality, the unplanned interactions and conversations that shape and nurture communities?

 

Other Driving Questions

  1. What can the design of the building do to promote a culture of innovation in academic programs?
  2. How will students and faculty interact in this building, and how are team based collaborations supported within and outside of formal instruction times?
  3. How can we design for the future and encourage innovation and new ways of learning?
  4. How do we create an environment of entrepreneurial thinking, with the vibrancy and experimentation atmosphere of the West coast combined with the structure and richness of the Northeast academic history?
  5. How can we create awareness, connections and  encourage collaboration through our architecture?
  6. How do we capture the “Maker” experience of rapidly prototyping ideas in a non-STEM building?
  7. How essential is territorialization in a dynamic, academic environment, and what are the boundaries that should be defined by the
    physical environment?
    .
    Since Bryant has been experimenting with rapidly adaptable learning environments, through recent campus renovations, the AIC project benefited from lessons learned, including:* Maximize clear structural dimensions to facilitate combining adjacent rooms if larger spaces are needed in a few years.
    * Make all tiers in classrooms easily removable to switch to flat floor environments if desired.
    * Maximize writing surfaces throughout the building.
    * Limit the negative impact of technology by creating spaces that encourage low-tech human interaction and promote hands on mapping of strategies and ideas

 

 

LearningSpaces-Spring2016

 

Other Driving Questions

  1. To enhance the educational experience, specifically for a large student population, what elements need to be considered in planning a learning community?
  2. How have technological advances in the science workplace changed the design of the undergraduate curriculum? How does this reshape space for different types of learning?
  3. How does the need for safety and efficiency drive operations and space planning?
  4. How do we create a welcoming environment and flexible learning spaces? How big is too big?
  5. How do we rigorously and responsibly plan for an unknown future?
  6. To support student success, what elements and adjacencies should an institution/design team consider for an academic building?

 

 

 

 

 

Labster: Empowering the Next Generation of Scientists to Change the World
Laboratory Simulations for Educators to Empower their STEM Students

From DSC:
I recently met Maaroof Fakhri at the Next Generation Learning Spaces Conference. It was a pleasure to meet him and hear him speak of the work they are doing at Labster (which is located in Denmark). He is very innovative, and he shines forth with a high degree of energy, creativity, and innovation.

Keep an eye on the work they are doing. Very sharp.

 

labster-march2016

 

 

Also see:

 

 

 

activelearning-labster-dec2015

 

 

learnathon

 

Learnathons, on the other hand are optimized sessions that teach participants how to apply what they learn as soon as possible. They are on the opposite end of how classroom teaching is organized, with lessons spread out over the course of a semester focusing on theory and weekly practice. They are a fairly new concept, but have created an environment for learning that is speeding up comprehension and application to levels that aren’t seen elsewhere.

 

 

 

Addendum on 3/16/16:

What are Remote Labs? <– from ilabcentral.org

Making high school science labs more real, more engaging, and more accessible
Remote Online laboratories (iLabs) are experimental facilities that can be accessed through the Internet, allowing students and educators to carry out experiments from anywhere at any time.

 

iLabCentral-march2016

 

 
© 2017 | Daniel Christian