Some scripture for us

Psalms 121:5-6


Hebrews 2:17-18 NIV

For this reason he had to be made like them, fully human in every way, in order that he might become a merciful and faithful high priest in service to God, and that he might make atonement for the sins of the people. Because he himself suffered when he was tempted, he is able to help those who are being tempted.


Lamentations 3:40 NIV

Let us examine our ways and test them, and let us return to the LORD.


Psalms 121:1-2


Jeremiah 31:31-34

31 “The days are coming,” declares the Lord,
    “when I will make a new covenant
with the people of Israel
    and with the people of Judah.
32 It will not be like the covenant
    I made with their ancestors
when I took them by the hand
    to lead them out of Egypt,
because they broke my covenant,
    though I was a husband to them,”
declares the Lord.
33 “This is the covenant I will make with the people of Israel
    after that time,” declares the Lord.
“I will put my law in their minds
    and write it on their hearts.
I will be their God,
    and they will be my people.
34 No longer will they teach their neighbor,
    or say to one another, ‘Know the Lord,’
because they will all know me,
    from the least of them to the greatest,”
declares the Lord.
“For I will forgive their wickedness
    and will remember their sins no more.”

 

Home schooling’s rise from fringe to fastest-growing form of education — from washingtonpost.com by Peter Jamison, Laura Meckler, Prayag Gordy, Clara Ence Morse and Chris Alcantara
A district-by-district look at home schooling’s explosive growth, which a Post analysis finds has far outpaced the rate at private and public schools

 

The Game-Changer: How Legal Technology is Transforming the Legal Sector — from todaysconveyancer.co.uk by Perfect Portal

Rob Lawson, Strategic Sales Manager at Perfect Portal discussed why he thinks legal technology is so important:

“I spent almost 20 years in private practice and was often frustrated at the antiquated technology and processes that were deployed. It is one of the reasons that I love working in legal tech to provide solutions and streamline processes in the modern law firm. One of the major grumbles for practitioners is the amount of admin that they must do to fulfil the needs of their clients. Technology can automate routine tasks, streamline processes, and help manage large volumes of data more effectively. This then allows legal professionals to focus on more strategic aspects of their work. Ultimately this will increase efficiency and productivity.”



Some gen AI vendors say they’ll defend customers from IP lawsuits. Others, not so much. — from techcrunch.com by Kyle Wiggers

A person using generative AI — models that generate text, images, music and more given a prompt — could infringe on someone else’s copyright through no fault of their own. But who’s on the hook for the legal fees and damages if — or rather, when — that happens?

It depends.

In the fast-changing landscape of generative AI, companies monetizing the tech — from startups to big tech companies like Google, Amazon and Microsoft — are approaching IP risks from very different angles.


Clio Goes All Out with Major Product Announcements, Including A Personal Injury Add-On, E-Filing, and (Of Course) Generative AI — from lawnext.com by Bob Ambrogi

At its annual Clio Cloud Conference in Nashville today, the law practice management company Clio introduced an array of major new products and product updates, calling the series of announcements its most expansive product update ever in its 15-year history.


AI will invert the biglaw pyramid — from alexofftherecord.com by Cece Xie

These tasks that GPT can now handle are, coincidentally, common tasks for junior associates. From company and transaction summaries to legal research and drafting memos, analyzing and drafting have long been the purview of bright-eyed, bushy-tailed new law grads.

If we follow the capitalistic impulse of biglaw firms to its logical conclusion, this means that junior associates may soon face obsolescence. Why spend an hour figuring out how to explain an assignment to a first-year associate when you can just ask CoCounsel in five minutes? And the initial output will likely be better than a first-year’s initial work product, too.

Given the immense cost-savings that legal GPT products can confer, I suspect the rise of AI in legal tech will coincide with smaller junior associate classes. Gone are the days of 50+ junior lawyers all working on the same document review or due diligence. Instead, a fraction of those junior lawyers will be hired to oversee and QC the AI’s outputs. Junior associates will edit more than they do currently and manage more than they do right now. Juniors will effectively be more like midlevels from the get-go.


Beyond Law Firms: How Legal Tech’s Real Frontier Lies With SMBs (small and medium-sized businesses) — from forbes.com by Charles Brecque

Data and artificial intelligence are transforming the legal technology space—there’s no doubt about it. A recent Thomson Reuters Institute survey of lawyers showed that a large majority (82%) of respondents believe ChatGPT and generative AI can be readily applied to legal work.

While it’s tempting to think of legal tech as a playground exclusive to law firms, as technology enables employees without legal training to use and create legal frameworks and documentation, I’d like to challenge that narrative. Being the founder of a company that uses AI to manage contracts, the way I see it is the real magic happens when legal tech tools meet the day-to-day challenges of small and medium-sized businesses (known as “SMBs”).

 

Student Use Cases for AI: Start by Sharing These Guidelines with Your Class — from hbsp.harvard.edu by Ethan Mollick and Lilach Mollick

To help you explore some of the ways students can use this disruptive new technology to improve their learning—while making your job easier and more effective—we’ve written a series of articles that examine the following student use cases:

  1. AI as feedback generator
  2. AI as personal tutor
  3. AI as team coach
  4. AI as learner

Recap: Teaching in the Age of AI (What’s Working, What’s Not) — from celt.olemiss.edu by Derek Bruff, visiting associate director

Earlier this week, CETL and AIG hosted a discussion among UM faculty and other instructors about teaching and AI this fall semester. We wanted to know what was working when it came to policies and assignments that responded to generative AI technologies like ChatGPT, Google Bard, Midjourney, DALL-E, and more. We were also interested in hearing what wasn’t working, as well as questions and concerns that the university community had about teaching and AI.


Teaching: Want your students to be skeptical of ChatGPT? Try this. — from chronicle.com by Beth McMurtrie

Then, in class he put them into groups where they worked together to generate a 500-word essay on “Why I Write” entirely through ChatGPT. Each group had complete freedom in how they chose to use the tool. The key: They were asked to evaluate their essay on how well it offered a personal perspective and demonstrated a critical reading of the piece. Weiss also graded each ChatGPT-written essay and included an explanation of why he came up with that particular grade.

After that, the students were asked to record their observations on the experiment on the discussion board. Then they came together again as a class to discuss the experiment.

Weiss shared some of his students’ comments with me (with their approval). Here are a few:


2023 EDUCAUSE Horizon Action Plan: Generative AI — from library.educause.edu by Jenay Robert and Nicole Muscanell

Asked to describe the state of generative AI that they would like to see in higher education 10 years from now, panelists collaboratively constructed their preferred future.
.

2023-educause-horizon-action-plan-generative-ai


Will Teachers Listen to Feedback From AI? Researchers Are Betting on It — from edsurge.com by Olina Banerji

Julie York, a computer science and media teacher at South Portland High School in Maine, was scouring the internet for discussion tools for her class when she found TeachFX. An AI tool that takes recorded audio from a classroom and turns it into data about who talked and for how long, it seemed like a cool way for York to discuss issues of data privacy, consent and bias with her students. But York soon realized that TeachFX was meant for much more.

York found that TeachFX listened to her very carefully, and generated a detailed feedback report on her specific teaching style. York was hooked, in part because she says her school administration simply doesn’t have the time to observe teachers while tending to several other pressing concerns.

“I rarely ever get feedback on my teaching style. This was giving me 100 percent quantifiable data on how many questions I asked and how often I asked them in a 90-minute class,” York says. “It’s not a rubric. It’s a reflection.”

TeachFX is easy to use, York says. It’s as simple as switching on a recording device.

But TeachFX, she adds, is focused not on her students’ achievements, but instead on her performance as a teacher.


ChatGPT Is Landing Kids in the Principal’s Office, Survey Finds — from the74million.org by Mark Keierleber
While educators worry that students are using generative AI to cheat, a new report finds students are turning to the tool more for personal problems.

Indeed, 58% of students, and 72% of those in special education, said they’ve used generative AI during the 2022-23 academic year, just not primarily for the reasons that teachers fear most. Among youth who completed the nationally representative survey, just 23% said they used it for academic purposes and 19% said they’ve used the tools to help them write and submit a paper. Instead, 29% reported having used it to deal with anxiety or mental health issues, 22% for issues with friends and 16% for family conflicts.

Part of the disconnect dividing teachers and students, researchers found, may come down to gray areas. Just 40% of parents said they or their child were given guidance on ways they can use generative AI without running afoul of school rules. Only 24% of teachers say they’ve been trained on how to respond if they suspect a student used generative AI to cheat.


Embracing weirdness: What it means to use AI as a (writing) tool — from oneusefulthing.org by Ethan Mollick
AI is strange. We need to learn to use it.

But LLMs are not Google replacements, or thesauruses or grammar checkers. Instead, they are capable of so much more weird and useful help.


Diving Deep into AI: Navigating the L&D Landscape — from learningguild.com by Markus Bernhardt

The prospect of AI-powered, tailored, on-demand learning and performance support is exhilarating: It starts with traditional digital learning made into fully adaptive learning experiences, which would adjust to strengths and weaknesses for each individual learner. The possibilities extend all the way through to simulations and augmented reality, an environment to put into practice knowledge and skills, whether as individuals or working in a team simulation. The possibilities are immense.

Thanks to generative AI, such visions are transitioning from fiction to reality.


Video: Unleashing the Power of AI in L&D — from drphilippahardman.substack.com by Dr. Philippa Hardman
An exclusive video walkthrough of my keynote at Sweden’s national L&D conference this week

Highlights

  • The wicked problem of L&D: last year, $371 billion was spent on workplace training globally, but only 12% of employees apply what they learn in the workplace
  • An innovative approach to L&D: when Mastery Learning is used to design & deliver workplace training, the rate of “transfer” (i.e. behaviour change & application) is 67%
  • AI 101: quick summary of classification, generative and interactive AI and its uses in L&D
  • The impact of AI: my initial research shows that AI has the potential to scale Mastery Learning and, in the process:
    • reduce the “time to training design” by 94% > faster
    • reduce the cost of training design by 92% > cheaper
    • increase the quality of learning design & delivery by 96% > better
  • Research also shows that the vast majority of workplaces are using AI only to “oil the machine” rather than innovate and improve our processes & practices
  • Practical tips: how to get started on your AI journey in your company, and a glimpse of what L&D roles might look like in a post-AI world

 

Post-prison job training — hechingerreport.org by Olivia Sanchez and Tara García Mathewson

We’ve known for a long time that higher education can play a huge role in helping people who serve time in prison get back on their feet. Research shows that higher-ed attainment is directly correlated with a lower likelihood of being reincarcerated, as is stable employment.

But people getting out of prison face many obstacles in finding jobs, and lack of educational opportunities is just part of the issue. A patchwork of more than 14,000 federal, state and local laws and regulations restricts individuals who have arrest and conviction histories from getting licensed in certain fields. Here’s some of what my reporting found about how pervasive this problem is and why it matters:

 

Some scripture for us

Psalms 86:11
Teach me your way, LORD, that I may rely on your faithfulness; give me an undivided heart, that I may fear (respect/hold in awe) your name.

Amos 5:24
But let justice roll on like a river, righteousness like a never-failing stream!

Psalms 86:5
You, Lord, are forgiving and good, abounding in love to all who call to you.

Proverbs 17:17
A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for a time of adversity.

 

 

Holograms Are Coming To California State Parks — from vrscout.com by Kyle Melnick

Holograms Are Coming To California State Parks


AR Technology Is Invading The Kitchen — from vrscout.com by Kyle Melnick

Excerpt (emphasis DSC):

Could this immersive AR experience revolutionize the culinary arts?

Earlier this month, the popular culinary livestreaming network Kittch announced that it is partnering with American technology company Qualcomm to create hands-free cooking experiences accessible via AR glasses.


Apple Vision Pro, Higher Education and the Next 10 Years — from insidehighered.com by Joshua Kim
How this technology will play out in our world over the next decade.

 

From DSC:
Attention all school districts! Listen up! –> Top 10 Tips for Creating a Successful Onboarding Experience  — from learningguild.com by Tara Roberson-Moore, PhD

Excerpts:

Did you know that 69% of employees say they are likely to stay with a company for a least three years after a great onboarding experience? (O.C.Tanner, 2018)

Did you know that new hires in companies with longer onboarding programs report being more proficient in their roles four months sooner than in companies with short onboarding programs? (O.C. Tanner, 2018)

Also relevant/see:

Analyze This — from learningguild.com by Tara Roberson-Moore

Excerpt:

Onboarding is a program. It is not one training event. It is also usually not one development event either—I have seen onboarding programs built in one full development phase and I have seen onboarding programs divided into several development phases (costs are one factor, but project fatigue is also a factor). Due to the sheer size of a long-term initiative like onboarding, getting everything in place before development begins is imperative to success.

Analysis results in a plan. As we have mentioned before, you get the blueprint of the house—not the house. Remember, not even paint colors are being picked yet!

If you are thinking about creating an onboarding program, whether on your own or working with a really cool and fun troupe of elves, start by asking questions…


Cognitive Load and Virtual Training — from learningguild.com by Pamela Wise

Excerpt:

 As designers navigate the waters of building learning interventions that utilize virtual technology, they must keep the learner’s cognitive load low in order to increase learning retention. As with all instructional design, virtual training should utilize effective instructional methods. However, studies have shown that some virtual training strategies, such as immersion, may increase the cognitive load in one setting but decrease it in another.

 

 

Why Faculty Must Learn to Swim in Other Waters — from insidehighered.com by Rachel Toor, professor of creative writing at Eastern Washington University in Spokane.

Excerpts:

Academics, even with the best intentions, and especially if we’ve never left school, don’t realize that we’re all swimming in our own little pond.

Most faculty members continue to teach how they were taught. We focus on our disciplines. We indoctrinate students into academic conventions and genres. We sling jargon like short-order cooks. We ask students to write 20-page research papers—the likes of which few professions would ever require.

But how often do faculty members require students to create final projects that will help them get a job?

How many professors are adept at writing a one-page job cover letter? Or a one-page résumé?

From DSC:
I appreciate these great thoughts here from Rachel Toor. Besides helping students learn about networking (and actually putting those skills into practice), applying their research skills to finding good job/organization fits, write effective cover letters, etc., I think such real-world skill development needs to be integrated into the very core of what they are teaching. It needs to be integrated into the curriculum. 
 

ChatGPT for Spanish Classrooms — from rdene915.com by Nicole Biscotti, M. Ed.

Excerpt:

ChatGPT is just what the busy Spanish teacher necesita – no wasted time searching for the perfect “lectura” (text). Effective language instruction is coupled with learning about culture and now I’m able to generate texts in seconds AND I can even center them around a Latin American country, cultural point of interest, holiday, grammatical structure, etc.  Differentiation and personalized learning, those lofty teaching ideals that can feel a bit heavy when you mean well but have 35 kids in your room, have become that much easier to attain with ChatGPT.  It’s possible to generate texts about diverse aspects of culture in seconds and make adjustments for interests, length, rigor, etc. (Kuo & Lai, 2006) (Salaberry, 1999; Rost, 2002).

CURATING YOUR CLASSROOM WITH 9 MUST-HAVE TOOLS FOR RESOURCE COLLECTION – EASY EDTECH PODCAST 202 — from classtechtips.com by Monica Burns

Description:

How do you share resources with students? In this episode, we’ll focus on what happens after you find the very best resources to share with students. You’ll also hear about nine digital tools to help educators build a resource collection for students. So whether you have ten great resources on endangered species to share with your fourth graders or a dozen tutorial videos to share with your eleventh graders, this episode is for you!

50+ Useful AI Writing Tools to Know (2023) — from hongkiat.com

Excerpt:

AI writing tools generate content based on the keywords or prompt provided by users. You can then improve upon the output and make it suitable according to your own requirements.

There are different types of AI writing tools and in this post we are featuring some of the best ones. From content generators and editors to translators and typing assistants, there’s a whole gamut of AI-powered writing tools in the list. Take a look and see if one (or more) catches your interest.

How to Use Minecraft as a Teaching Tool — from intelligenthq.com

Excerpt:

Kids today have grown up with Minecraft, so it’s easy to get them enthusiastic about lessons using it. They can build anything they like, and use Minecraft skins to make the characters they create uniquely their own, getting them especially enthusiastic and involved in their lessons.

Teachers who learn how to use Minecraft as a teaching tool have found that it noticeably improves problem solving, creativity, and the ability to work together. It teaches both 21st century skills and timeless lessons.


On a somewhat related note, also see:


 

Radar Trends to Watch: February 2023 — from oreilly.com by Mike Loukides
Developments in Data, Programming, Security, and More

Excerpt:

One application for ChatGPT is writing documentation for developers, and providing a conversational search engine for the documentation and code. Writing internal documentation is an often omitted part of any software project.

DoNotPay has developed an AI “lawyer” that is helping a defendant make arguments in court. The lawyer runs on a cell phone, through which it hears the proceedings. It tells the defendant what to say through Bluetooth earbuds. DoNotPay’s CEO notes that this is illegal in almost all courtrooms. (After receiving threats from bar associations, DoNotPay has abandoned this trial.)

Matter, a standard for smart home connectivity, appears to be gaining momentum. Among other things, it allows devices to interact with a common controller, rather than an app (and possibly a hub) for each device.

 

Podcast at Future U -- Solving the problem of college costs

The Case of College Costs — as found at “ChatGPT Growing Strong, Sparking Teacher’s AI Fears” — from by Michael Horn, Jeff Selingo, Bill Troutt, & Susan Dynarski

Per Michael (emphasis DSC):
Several things struck me in the episode. Among them were:

  • How prescient the National Commission on the Cost of Higher Education was all the way back in 1998 when it said that “continued inattention to issues of cost and price threatens to create a gulf of ill will between institutions of higher education and the public they serve.”
  • And Bill’s observation that the forgiveness of student loans probably wouldn’t spur much in the way of strategic conversations for boards of trustees at colleges.

Also relevant/see:

By Bryan Alexander, Bruce Kimball, & Sarah Iler

 

 

Isaiah 10:1

10 Woe to those who make unjust laws,
    to those who issue oppressive decrees,

 

Some scripture for you

James 3:17 

17 But the wisdom that comes from heaven is first of all pure; then peace-loving, considerate, submissive, full of mercy and good fruit, impartial and sincere.

2 Corinthians 13:14
14 May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all.

Proverbs 4:23

23 Above all else, guard your heart,
    for everything you do flows from it.

2 Corinthians 10:17-18

17 But, “Let the one who boasts boast in the Lord.” 18 For it is not the one who commends himself who is approved, but the one whom the Lord commends.

25 Fear of man will prove to be a snare,
    but whoever trusts in the Lord is kept safe.

 
© 2022 | Daniel Christian