Best Vlogging Camera in 2020 — from adventurerinyou.com

Excerpt (emphasis DSC):

Making videos for YouTube has become a profession. Video blogging today is not just a hobby. This is a way of earning, which has saved many from having to go to work. The so-called vlogs (short for “video blog“) have become extremely popular. But the most difficult question for beginners: what camera to use to shoot your first video? I have prepared a list of the best cameras for YouTube, given their cost, quality and popularity.

 

The Canon EOS M50 Popular Budget Vlogger Camera

 

Video blogging can be an interesting way to tell stories, gain recognition, or even make a living. If you want to make a video blog of your dreams or just want to shoot funny videos to entertain your friends, you can always find the right camera. And remember, if you find it difficult to make a decision, a rental service can be a good way to decide. Try working with different cameras before you invest in one. So you will be sure that you will get exactly what you need.

 

An analysis of the value of the ways of learning at work — from modernworkplacelearning.com by Jane Hart

An analysis of the value of the ways of learning at work

However, I think the most interesting profile of them all is for those who are in non-salaried/freelance positions in the workplace (8%). These people still highly value learning from the daily work, but for them learning from professional networking and access to external resources and blogs and feeds is much more important to them than through internal resources and courses. Interestingly, though conferences are valued less than the average profile – which is probably due to cost and the more significant fact that they can learn more efficiently in other ways.

I believe this is the profile that is going to become more and more relevant and important as the work environment changes, where there are no jobs for life and everyone needs to take responsibility for their own learning and development.

 

The LexBlog Excellence Awards 2019 Winners

Categories

Awards will be presented for outstanding posts in the following categories. Unless stated otherwise, posts can relate to any subject or area, provided it is related to the practice or theory of law. The post must have been published in 2019.

  • Best News or Trend Analysis: For outstanding analysis of legal news, developments or trends.
  • Best Legal Analysis: For outstanding analysis and explication of a judicial opinion, legislative development or regulatory development.
  • Best Breaking News Post: For outstanding same-day or second-day reporting of a legal news development.
  • Best Explanatory Post: For outstanding writing in helping the reader comprehend the impact or significance of a legal story, development or trend.
  • Best ‘How-To’ Post: For outstanding writing in helping the reader understand how to handle a legal matter or issue.
  • Best Commentary/Advice for Legal Professionals: For outstanding writing offering commentary or advice for legal professionals on the business or practice of law.
 

Evergreen Data Visualization  — from stephanieevergreen.com; with thanks to Mr. Pat Bailey for his post on LinkedIn.com about this resource

From DSC:
If you are using RSS feeds along with a product like Feedly, it might be worth subscribing to the stream of content originating at stephanieevergreen.com/blog/. I appreciated her designs in crafting/relaying narratives via the data that she has worked with.

Here’s an example posting:

 

30 influential AI presentations from 2019 — from re-work.co

Excerpt:

It feels as though 2019 has gone by in a flash, that said, it has been a year in which we have seen great advancement in AI application methods and technical discovery, paving the way for future development. We are incredibly grateful to have had the leading minds in AI & Deep Learning present their latest work at our summits in San Francisco, Boston, Montreal and more, so we thought we would share thirty of our highlight videos with you as we think everybody needs to see them!. (Some are hosted on our Videohub and some on our YouTube, but all are free to view!).

Example presenters:

  • Dawn Song, Professor, UC Berkeley.
  • Doina Precup, Research Team Lead, DeepMind.
  • Natalie Jakomis, Group Director of Data, goCompare.
  • Ian Goodfellow, Director, Apple.
  • Timnit Gebru, Ethical AI Team, Google.
  • Cathy Pearl, Head of Conversation Design Outreach, Google.
  • Zoya Bylinskii, Research Scientist, Adobe Research.
  • …and many others
 

 

From DSC:
I wish that more faculty members would share their research, teaching methods, knowledge, and commentary with the world as this professor does (vs. talking to other professors behind publishers’ walled off content). In this case, Arvind happens to use Twitter. But if one doesn’t like to use Twitter, there’s also LinkedIn, WordPress/blogging, podcasting, and other outlets. 

 

 

 

Per Jane Hart on LinkedIn:

Top 200 Tools for Learning 2019 is now published, together with:

PLUS analysis of how these tools are being used in different context, new graphics, and updated comments on the tools’ pages that show how people are using the tools.

 

 

 

Educational Web Tools to Empower Students Voice in Class — from educatorstechnology.com

Excerpt:

At the core of progressive pedagogy is the empowerment of students by giving them a voice in class and making them part of the decision making. Unlike traditional instruction where  students are viewed as passive receivers of  pre-designed knowledge, a progressive instruction is primarily student-centered and dialogic in nature. It views students as subjects with a sense of agency capable of co-constructing their own knowledge. This pedagogical stance is especially popularized by educationists such as John Dewy, Paulo Freire, Maxine Greene, and Vygotsky. For these theorists, learning is driven by curiosity, inquiry and self-discovery, processes which involve students in their own learning and makes their learning meaningful.

With the help of web technologies, you can use a wide variety of web tools with students to provide them with an outlet through which they can express their voices. Here are some examples to try …

 

 

Five Principles for Thinking Like a Futurist — from er.educause.edu by Marina Gorbis

Excerpt:

In 2018 we celebrated the fifty-year anniversary of the founding of the Institute for the Future (IFTF). No other futures organization has survived for this long; we’ve actually survived our own forecasts! In these five decades we learned a lot, and we still believe—even more strongly than before—that systematic thinking about the future is absolutely essential for helping people make better choices today, whether you are an individual or a member of an educational institution or government organization. We view short-termism as the greatest threat not only to organizations but to society as a whole.

In my twenty years at the Institute, I’ve developed five core principles for futures thinking:

  • Forget about predictions.
  • Focus on signals.*
  • Look back to see forward.
  • Uncover patterns.*
  • Create a community.

 

* From DSC:
I have a follow up thought regarding those bullet points about signals and patterns. With today’s exponential pace of technological change, I have asserted for several years now that our students — and all of us really — need to be skilled in pulse-checking the relevant landscapes around us. That’s why I’m a big fan of regularly tapping into — and contributing towards — streams of content. Subscribing to RSS feeds, following organizations and/or individuals on Twitter, connecting with people on LinkedIn, etc. Doing so will help us identify trends, patterns, and the signals that Marina talks about in her article.

It reminds me of the following graphic from January 2017:

 

 

From DSC:
There are all kinds of topics/legal areas represented in this network. Check it out!

 

 

Math Visuals — from mathvisuals.wordpress.com

Examples:

 

 

 

 

 

From DSC:
Below is a graphic from an article by Jane Hart that’s entitled, “A seamless working and learning environment“- to me, it’s another good example/graphic of a learning ecosystem. This one happens to belong to an organization, but each of us has our own learning ecosystem as well.

 

Another good example/graphic of a learning ecosystem

 

 

Best camera for vlogging 2019: 10 perfect choices tested — from techradar.com by Matthew Richards
Here are our top 10 vlogging camera picks

 

From DSC:
Also, with a different kind of camera in mind…and with a shout out to Mr. Charles Mickens (CIO / Associate Dean of Innovation and Technology at the WMU-Cooley Law School) see the amazing Light L16 Camera:

 

 

A Little Bit of Light from light on Vimeo.

 

 

From DSC:
First of all, an excerpt from an email from RetrievalPractice.org:

Last week, we talked about an activity we call Flash Forward. Simply ask your students these questions:

“Now that you’ve taken this class, what is one thing you want to remember 10 years from now (and why)?”

“How will you remember that one thing? What will you do to make sure you don’t forget?”

Second of all, the topic of remembering something 10 years from now (from some current learning) made me think about obtaining a long-term return on investment (ROI) from that learning.

In the online-based course that I’ve been teaching for a while now, I’m all about helping the students in my classes obtain long-term benefits from taking the class. Grades aren’t the key. The learning is the key!

The class is entitled, “Foundations of Information Technology” and I want them to be using the tools, technologies, services, and concepts (that we learned about) loooooong after they graduate from college! We work on things like RSS feeds, Twitter, LinkedIn, WordPress, building their network, building their personal brand, HTML/web design, Microsoft Excel, the Internet of Things and much more. I want them to be practicing those things, leveraging those tools, pulse-checking their surroundings, networking with others, serving others with their gifts, and building on the foundations that they put into place waaaay back in 201__.

 

 

 
 

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