From DSC:

  • What if you want to allow some remote students to come on into your face-to-face classroom?
    .
  • What if you want to allow those remote students to be seen and communicated with at eye level?
    .
  • What if you want Remote Student A to join Group 1, and Remote Student B to join Group 2?
    .

Well…how about using one of these devices  in order to do so!


 

New video collaboration robot: TelePresence gets moving — from cisco.com by Dave Evans

Excerpt:

That is why Cisco’s new joint effort with iRobot—demonstrated publicly this week for the first time—is so exciting: We’ve created a mobile Cisco TelePresence unit that brings collaboration to you—or, conversely, brings you to wherever you need to collaborate. Called iRobot Ava 500, this high-definition video collaboration robot combines Cisco TelePresence with iRobot’s mobility and self-navigation capabilities, enabling freedom of movement and spontaneous interactions with people thousands of miles away.

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irobot-june-10-2013
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iRobot Ava™ 500 Video Collaboration Robot — published on Jun 10, 2013
iRobot and Cisco have teamed to bring the Ava 500 video collaboration robot to market. The robot blends iRobot’s autonomous navigation with Cisco’s TelePresence to enable people working off-site to participate in meetings and presentations where movement and location spontaneity are important. The new robot is also designed to enable mobile visual access to manufacturing facilities, laboratories, customer experience centers and other remote facilities.

 

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Double Robotics Double

http://www.doublerobotics.com/img/use-office.jpg

 

 

MantaroBot™ TeleMe

 

 

 

From Attack of the Telepresence Robots! — from BYTE  by Rick Lehrbaum

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Kubi

http://twimgs.com/informationweek/byte/reviews/2013-Jan/robotic-telepresence/kubi.jpg

 

 

MantaroBot “TeleMe” VGo Communications “VGo” Anybots “QB” Suitable Technologies “Beam”

 

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RP-7i ROBOT

RP-7i Remote Presence Robot

 

Also see:

 

For Ivy League grads, tech trumps Wall Street — from SmartPlanet.com by Kirsten Korosec

Excerpt:

A wave of young professionals–as well as recent grads–are bypassing (or leaving) Wall Street to take jobs within the high-tech sector, reported the Wall Street Journal. Nowhere is this trend more evident than in New York City, where employments in securities and banking fell 10 percent to 163,600 jobs in the past five years. Over the same time period, high-tech employments rose 10 percent to 275,600 by mid-2010, according to data from the New York State Department of Labor, reported the WSJ.

 

The IT conversation we should be having — from HBR.org by Jim Stikeleather

Excerpt (emphasis DSC):

It is a conversation about the increasing importance of information technology and the role it must assume in every enterprise, regardless of size, industry or geography.

Our observations:

  • CEOs are demanding more visible value from their CIOs, in terms of generating revenue, gaining new customers, and increasing customer satisfaction.
  • Increasingly, the CIO and IT must be seen less as developing and deploying technology, and more as a source of innovation and transformation that delivers business value, leveraging technology instead of directly delivering it.
  • The CIO must be responsible and accountable if technology enables, facilitates or accelerates competition that the C-suite didn’t see coming, or allows the enterprise to miss opportunities because the C-suite did not understand the possibilities technology offered.
  • CIOs today must adapt or risk being marginalized.

 

From DSC:
This is critical in the higher ed space as well!

The majority of the higher education industry still isn’t getting it — we are operating in a brand new ball game where technology must be used strategically It’s not just about building and maintaining the infrastructure/plumbing anymore (though that is extremely important as well). It’s about the strategic, innovative use of IT that counts from here on out.

 

 

Teens and Technology 2013 — from pewinternet.org by Mary Madden, Amanda Lenhart, Maeve Duggan, Sandra Cortesi, Urs Gasser

Excerpt:

“The nature of teens’ internet use has transformed dramatically — from stationary connections tied to shared desktops in the home to always-on connections that move with them throughout the day,” said Mary Madden, Senior Researcher for the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project and co-author of the report. “In many ways, teens represent the leading edge of mobile connectivity, and the patterns of their technology use often signal future changes in the adult population.”

IBM CEO predicts three ways technology will transform the future of business — from forbes.com by Jenna Goudreau

 

Virginia Rometty

Virginia Rometty

 

  1. Data analytics will revolutionize decision-making
  2. The social network will drive value
  3. Consumer segments will cede to the individual
    .

“The greatest contribution of this shift,” Rometty concluded,
“is that it will force every entity to become an authentic organization.”

PBS LearningMedia Spotlight: Young Inventors, Designers & Innovative Thinkers
Spark your students’ curiosity in engineering and technology by introducing them to the designers, inventors, and clever thinkers featured in PBS LearningMedia. Use their stories to illustrate various themes of study like the engineering design process and the impact of technology. For free access to PBS LearningMedia, register today!

Designing a Wheelchair for Rugby
Grades 6-12 | Video | Inventions
See what happens when a U.S. Paralympic athlete challenges two teams of high school students to build an automated wheelchair. Use this segment to initiate a design challenge in your own classroom.

Wind Energy Fuels Jobs for Oklahoma Youth
Grades 6-13+ | Video | Innovations
How can your students affect the world around them? Use this video segment about wind energy to illustrate the real-world impact of an innovative idea.

Scientist Profile: Inventor
Grades 4-6 | Video | Inventions

Get your class excited about great ideas! Introduce them to Ryan Patterson, teen scientist and inventor of an electronic sign language translator glove.

Kid Designer: A Comfortable Cardboard Chair
Grades 3-12 | Video | Inventions

Introduce your class to this industrious young designer who demonstrates how to construct a sturdy chair out of cardboard.

A House for Teddy Bear
Grades K-2 | Video | Problem Solving

See these young learners engaged in problem solving and trial-and-error design! Consider replicating this project in your own classroom to reinforce lessons on design, construction, and experimentation.

Sid’s Amazing Invention
PreK-1 | Video | Problem Solving

Sid believes that he has invented the ultimate solution to putting away his toys, later to learn that his invention is actually a simple machine called a lever. Invite young learners to explore the function of a lever alongside Sid and his friends.

Technology trends that are driving Internet of Things markets — from onworld.com
ON World has identified the key technology advances that are making 2013 a pivotal year for the Internet of Things (IoT).  Dozens of cloud addressable wireless sensors were demonstrated at CES and Bluetooth Smart products increased by 5X from last fall.

Excerpt (emphasis DSC):

San Diego, CA , Jan. 30, 2013 — Within the next five years, billions of Internet connected wireless smart objects will be in use, according to global technology research firm ON World.

“Cloud services combined with smart mobile devices have created a new landscape of opportunities for service providers, manufacturers and developers,” says Mareca Hatler, ON World’s research director.  “As demonstrated by dozens of cloud addressable wireless sensing systems shown at CES this year, a new generation of Internet connected systems is underway.”

The major technology trends that are driving Internet of Things (IoT) markets include the following…

 

Innovations

3D printers are changing how designers make and market art — from bwebpronews.com by Zach Walton

Also see:

Tagged with:  

BBC-GuideToNext150Years-Jan2013

 

From DSC:
Some potential scenarios of our future.  Are there implications for how we educate today’s students? For our curriculum?

 

 

 

CES 2013: What to expect — from gdgt.com

Excerpt:

The biggest consumer electronics event of the year is about to start. And while certain major companies won’t be there (we’re talking to you, Microsoft and Apple), those that are will be showing off some exciting new gadgets, including 4K TVs, touchscreen displays, and next-generation smartphones and tablets. Here’s what we’re expecting, based on what we’ve seen so far.

 

From DSC:
Though Apple TV will be “the elephant in the room”, the questions I ponder are:

 

  • What would educationally-related apps look like if smart/connected TVs and second screen devices continue to make their way into the living room?
    .
  • What new functionality and pedagogies would open up to us if Learning from the Living [Class] Room came to fruition?
    .
  • Will MOOCs morph into something that will make it’s way into our living rooms? What about if corporations offered their own MOOCs?

 

Arts organizations and digital technologies — from PewInternet.org

Excerpt:

  • Social media, online video and pictures, mobile apps, websites, and email have transformed the arts in America
  • Many cultural organizations say that digital technology gives them powerful new ways to promote events, engage with audiences, reach new patrons, and extend the life and scope of their work
  • But challenges arise as organizations cope with tech-driven staffing and budgeting demands and technology itself has led to concerns about everything from cell phone interruptions at performances, to increasing competition for the public’s entertainment dollars, to a growing audience expectation that digital content should be free

 

Tagged with:  

The future of intelligence [Wheeler]

The future of intelligence — from Learning with ‘e’s by Steve Wheeler

Excerpt:

This is the third in a series of blog posts on the future of learning and technology. In my previous blog post I examined the debate about whether we are becoming more intelligent or less intelligent as a result of our prolonged and habituated uses of technology. I believe that if we are to fully apprehend the many issues and nuances of our relationship with future technologies, we first need to begin to appreciate the complexity of human intelligence(s) and the problems associated with trying to model these digitally.

 

 

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