KPCB Internet Trends 2013by Mary Meeker and Liang Wu on May 29, 2013

Description:

The latest edition of the annual Internet Trends report finds continued robust online growth. There are now 2.4 billion Internet users around the world, and the total continues to grow apace. Mobile usage is expanding rapidly, while the mobile advertising opportunity remains largely untapped. The report reviews the shifting online landscape, which has become more social and content rich, with expanded use of photos, video and audio. Looking ahead, the report finds early signs of growth for wearable computing devices, like glasses, connected wrist bands and watches – and the emergence of connected cars, drones and other new platforms.

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I’d like to thank Canada’s George Siemens, Stephen Downes, Alec Couros, and Dave Cormier – as well as David Wiley over at BYU — for being the true pioneers of MOOCs.

I’d like to thank them for their innovative, entrepreneurial spirits and for their hard work in helping others build their own learning ecosystems.  It isn’t easy to  be change agents within the realm of higher education.  They have pressed the envelop many times.  Thanks all — and keep up the great work you guys!  (Now can you help integrate IBM’s Watson into what MOOCs morph into?! Please…?)

Also I’d like to thank to Audrey Watters over at the Hack Education blog for her recent keynote address at Canada’s Ed-Tech Innovation Conference where she minces no words to straighten the record out. It was her article — and Professor Wang’s comments from earlier today — that made me realize that I needed to post this item.

 

 

 

 

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Visualizing the future urban world — from fastcoexist.com by Ariel Schwartz
A new app called Urban World beautifully projects how cities around the world are going to explode in growth and economic power by 2025.

 

Also see:

 

UrbanWorld-March2013

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AmandaRipley-AskTheKids2012

 

Description:

Amanda Ripley is an investigative journalist who writes about human behavior and public policy. For Time Magazine and the Atlantic, she has chronicled the stories of American kids and teachers alongside groundbreaking new research into education reform. “Kids have strong opinions about school. We forget as adults how much time they sit there contemplating their situation.”

 

From DSC:
I post this now, because I just saw this via a post that Patrick Larkin made over the weekend —
Amanda Ripley’s intriguing talk on education reform that contains the following excerpt (bolding/emphasis DSC):

The video concludes with the following takeaways from these conversations:
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  • In the top performing countries in the world school is harder.
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  • No country is like the US with its obsession of playing sports.
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  • Kids (in schools in these other countries) believe there’s something in it for them.
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  • Kids believe that what they are doing in school impacts their futures.

 

Why predicting online learning developments is risky but necessary — from Tony Bates

Excerpt:

Before drawing up my outlook for 2013, I want to discuss the important topic of prediction in online learning, in particular how predictions are made, and what value they may have. Nate Silver’s excellent book (references are at the end of this article) looks at prediction in a number of fields: weather forecasting (excellent up to three days, useless after eight days), economic forecasting (hopeless by both media pundits and professional economists), baseball players’ performance (pretty good and improving), earthquakes (bad for major quakes, but promising for lesser quakes), poker and a number of other areas. He also has some interesting reflections on big data as well. Unfortunately though he doesn’t discuss prediction in online learning, so I’ll try and help out with this!

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carsten nicolai’s unidisplay: an extended private viewing — from derivative.ca

Examples:

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Exhibition Views, HangarBicocca, Milan, Italy. image © designboom

 

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Exhibition Views, HangarBicocca, Milan, Italy. Photos: Agostino Osio

 

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The training world is changing — from Harold Jarche

Excerpt:

Open online courses, talent management, social collaboration: The training world is changing. Traditional training structures, based on institutions, programs, courses and classes, are under pressure. One of the biggest changes we are seeing in online training is that the content-delivery model is being replaced by social and collaborative frameworks.

Here are just some of things happening now that trainers should be prepared to tackle in the new year:

Meet the Active Learning Classroom — from blogs.ucl.ac.uk by Fiona Strawbridge

Excerpt:

I attended a great workshop at the Educause conference on active learning classrooms – and specifically on the kinds of activities that can take place in them – led by the very energetic Adam Finkelstein of McGill University in Montreal.

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Architects: Levitt Goodman Architects
Location: Scott Library, York University, Toronto, Canada
Architect In Charge: Brock James
Design Team: Kris Payne, Amanda Reed
Project Year: 2010
Project Area: 17,000 sq ft
Client: York University
Budget: $1.9 Million
Photographs: Bob Gundu, Ben Rahn © A-Frame Inc.

 

 

.— originally saw this at Anne Whisken’s curated content at scoop.it

Does the U.S. accreditation system discriminate against online learning? — from Tony Bates

Excerpt:

Furthermore, problems remain in both Canada and the USA if students want to start taking online courses from an institution out of state or province then use that for advancement by transferring to a local university. The answer of course is more flexible credit transfer arrangements, more flexible prior learning assessment, and challenge exams, where students can demonstrate their learning without having to work through courses they have already taken elsewhere. Even some of the more prestigious research universities in Canada are realising that they need to be more flexible if they are to attract lifelong learners, for instance. Thus it’s as much up to the institutions as the regulators to ensure there is some flexibility in the system for students taking out of state or out of province online courses.

Yes, there needs to be sensible protections against fraud and fly-by-night online operators, but too often the restrictions, regulations and barriers are steeped in practices that no longer apply in an open, knowledge-based society. Every institution should be examining the structure of its courses, its admission requirements, its arrangements for credit transfer and prior learning assessment, and its strategy for lifelong learning, if it is to be fit for purpose in the 21st century. It is not an issue just of online learning.

From DSC:
Questions I often ponder re: accreditation:

  • Who sits on accrediting boards these days? Is it not people inside the current system?
  • What responsibilities do accreditation bodies have on them to enable/support change (where appropriate)?
  • Are such accreditation bodies feeling the pressure to help colleges and universities reinvent themselves in order to stay relevant? Or are they maintaining the status quo by all means possible?
  • Whose interests are ultimately being served by the current methods of accreditation? (I hope it’s the students!)

 

Classroom of 2020: The future is very different than you think — from theglobeandmail.com by Erin Millar

10 ideas for classroom video projects  — from educationaltechnology.ca by Alec Couros

Excerpt:

If you follow my Twitter-stream, you know that I spend a lot of time viewing, collecting & sharing videos. In this post, I share ideas on certain types of videos that I’ve gathered and how educators might use related methods or styles to engage students in constructing and deconstructing media while becoming critical consumers and producers of digital media.

 

Also see:

  • Chris Anderson – How web video powers global [innovation] — from innovationexcellence.com
    Excerpt:
    TED’s Chris Anderson says the rise of web video is driving a worldwide phenomenon he calls Crowd Accelerated Innovation — a self-fueling cycle of learning that could be as significant as the invention of print. But to tap into its power, organizations will need to embrace radical openness. And for TED, it means the dawn of a whole new chapter.

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