Below are some great resources re: creating your own e-books / streams of content — with thanks to Mr. Michael Haan, Technology Integration Specialist/Purchasing at Calvin College, for these resources
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From DSC:

You might also want to check out Lynda.com for the relevant training materials.
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Let’s create our own streams of content — always up-to-date — plus we could help our students save big $$!  And, as Michael pointed out, such tools could also be used internally for training-related and communications-related purposes.

Thanks Michael!!!

What's the best way to deal with ever-changing streams of content? When information has shrinking half-lives?

 

 

Part 3: Transmedia is a mindset, not a science — from by Matt Doherty — thanks to the Scoop from siobhan-o-flynn  at Tracking Transmedia
The end of TV as we know it & the rise of transmedia

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Also see:

The end of TV as we know it & the birth of transmedia — slideshare by Ogilvy & Mather

Doug Scott, President, OgilvyEntertainment and Matt Doherty, Transmedia Architect, Ogilvy & Mather Worldwide presented The End of TV as We Know It & The Birth of Transmedia at the 21st Century Storytelling Conference: Content, Context and Conversations sponsored by Microsoft, Ogilvy & BrainJuicer on July 31, 2012 in Chicago.

Throughout history, we have told stories. Stories are what connect us across geographies, cultures and experiences; stories demonstrate that we share the same hope, dreams, fears, challenges and desires. Today’s complex, digtally connected consumer universe makes brand storytelling more challenging, but also creates opportunities for brands to tell their stories in new ways.

Doug Scott and Matt Doherty discussed how the idea of TV might be a thing of the past, but the stories that drive our content will always be our constant. Our variable? Telling. Telling has evolved due to the primary role of digital in our lives and disruptive innovation which has given us the ability to craft transmedia experiences. Transmedia has brought about a new set of creative tools and narratives that are rooted in content, formed by context and crossed by all things culture. Are you a story? Or are you a teller?

 

My reflections on “MOOCs of Hazard” – a well-thought out, balanced article by Andrew Delbanco


From DSC: Below are my reflections on MOOCs of Hazard — from newrepublic.com by Andrew Delbanco — who asks:  Will online education dampen the college experience? Yes. Will it be worth it? Well…


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While I’m not sure that I agree with the idea that online education will dampen the college experience — and while I could point to some amazing capabilities that online education brings to the table in terms of true global exchanges — I’ll instead focus my comments on the following items:

 

1) Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are recent experiments — ones that will continue to change/morph into something else.
They are half-baked at best, but they should not be taken lightly. Christensen, Horn, Johnson are spot on with their theories of disruption here, especially as they relate to innovations occurring within the virtual/digital realm.  For example, the technologies behind IBM’s Watson could be mixed into the list of ingredients that will be used to develop MOOCs in the future.  It would be a very powerful, effective MOOC indeed if you could get the following parties/functionalities to the table:

  • IBM — to provide Watson like auto-curation/filtering capabilities, artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities, as well as data mining/learning analytics expertise, joined by
  • Several highly-creative firms from the film/media/novel/storytelling industry, who would be further joined by
  • Experts from Human Computer Interaction (HCI)/user interface/user experience design teams, who would be further joined by
  • Programmers and interaction specialists from educational gaming endeavors (and from those who can design simulations), joined by
  • Instructional designers, joined by
  • The appropriate Subject Matter Experts who can be reached by the students as necessary, joined by
  • Those skilled in research and library services, joined by
  • Legal experts to assist with copyright issues, joined by
  • Other specialists in mobile learning,  3D, web development, database administration, animation, graphic design, musicians, etc.

It won’t be long before this type of powerful team gets pulled together — from some organizations(s) with deep pockets — and the content is interacted with and presented to us within our living rooms via connected/Smart TVs and via second screen devices/applications.

2) The benefits of MOOCs
  • For colleges/universities:
    • MOOCs offer some serious marketing horsepower (rather than sound pedagogical tools, at this point in time at least)
    • They are forcing higher ed to become much more innovative
    • They provide great opportunities to build one’s personalized learning networks, as they bring forth those colleagues who are interested in topic A, B, or C
    • They move us closer to team-based content creation and delivery
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  • For students:
    • They offer a much less expensive option to go exploring disciplines for themselves…to see if they enjoy (and/or are gifted in) topic A, B or C
    • They provide great opportunities to build one’s personalized learning networks, as they bring forth those colleagues who are interested in topic A, B, or C
    • They provide a chance to see what it’s like to learn about something in a digital/virtual manner

3)  The drawbacks of MOOCs:
  • MOOCs are not nearly the same thing as what has come to be known as “online learning” — at least in the higher ed industry. MOOCs do not yet offer what more “traditional” (can I say that?) online learning provides: Far more support and pedagogical/instructional design, instructor presence and dialog, student academic support services, advising, more student-to-student and student-to-faculty interaction, etc.
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  • MOOCs are like drinking from a firehose — there are too many blogs/RSS feeds, twitter feeds, websites, and other resources to review.

4) It would be wise for all of us to be involved with such experiments and have at least a subset of one’s college or university become much more nimble/responsive.

 

Also see:

Adobe launches collaboration platform for video pros — from creativebloq.com
The software giant lends a hand to teams using its professional video tools with the launch of new service ‘Adobe Anywhere for Video’.

 

adobe advance
Adobe Anywhere for video aims to make your life easier

Excerpt:

Adobe have been keen to attract the attention of web designers this week, announcing updates to Flash Pro, Edge Reflow and Dreamweaver. But video professionals haven’t been forgotten, with the big news being the launch of Adobe Anywhere.

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Also see (from Adobe’s site):

AdobeAnywhereForVideo-April2013

WatchitooClassroom-April2013

 

 

Also see:

Watchitoo, Pearson LearningStudio offer real-time HD video chat option for online courses — from thejournal.com by Caitlin Moriarity

Excerpt:

Watchitoo and Pearson eCollege have teamed up to add an integrated collaboration solution, including real-time video chat, to the Pearson LearningStudio SaaS online education platform.

SXSWi Report: Liquid journalism and dynamic storytelling emerge in 2013 — from waggeneredstrom.com by Eddie Rehfeldt

Excerpt:

Breaking News: the search for a better narrative format for the internet is now available. Ben Decker once said “the internet is not just another TV pipe” and this was made apparent at SXSWi in Austin last week.  “Liquid Journalism” or interactive storytelling hit the Lone Star state with a vengeance.

 

 

 

From DSC:
Some reflections onHollywood meets higher ed — a thought-provoking post by Amanda Ripley

Excerpt:

But online classes are different than the in-person kind: Not only do they have a huge potential profit upside, given the ability to attract tens of thousands of students worldwide, but they are, at their best, performances. No one likes to say this out loud in academia, but it’s true: the most impactful MOOCs are also entertaining. The teacher does not need to be a singing, dancing, joke-telling maniac, but the teacher does need to be riveting, one way or another. The production quality needs to be high. Or the students will evaporate, clicking off to Facebook or Twitter or one of the many other online classes multiplying on the Internet.

 

From DSC:
I post this with a fair amount of hesitation, as mixing the words “higher ed” with Hollywood makes me very uneasy…but Amanda makes some good points in her posting and she highlights yet another potential disruption to the way things are:

 

creativelive-mardch2013

 

ClearSlide acquires SlideRocket to expand its rich presentation capabilities for sales teams — from ClearSlide.com — with special thanks going out to Mr. Cal Keen, Tech. Integration Specialist at Calvin College,  for the heads-up on these tools

Excerpt (emphasis DSC):

Founded in 2006 and with more than one million users, SlideRocket reinvented presentations by adding interactive capabilities like video, audio, rich media, and analytics in a hosted platform to elevate storytelling and deliver tangible results.

“SlideRocket has always been focused on helping teams communicate ideas more effectively,” said Chuck Dietrich, vice president and general manager, VMware. “Bringing SlideRocket’s creative presentation production capabilities to the ClearSlide platform gives our collective customers much more power through the full sales process, from content creation to closing the deal.

 

From DSC:
These tools might also benefit those in higher ed as well, as it’s all about the ability to craft a message using multiple kinds of media and to engage an audience with that message.  So we see here another example of tools that are helping develop/leverage digital literacy.  They also involved interactivity, analytics, and storytelling — things that those of us working within higher education (especially with hybrid and online-based learning) should be interested in.  (For those involved with K-12 and higher ed, note the need for creativity here.)

 

 

 

 


As my contribution to #etMOOC, I wanted to pull together some resources re: digital storytelling:


 

Digital Storytelling – from app-list.posterous.com and HCS Mobile, which showcases students learning with mobile devices in Horry County Schools

Excerpt:

Digital Storytelling combines images, narration, and other audio to tell a story. Every content area has a story and each student is capable of telling it. The NETS Standards have students creating, collaborating, and producing their own unique content – digital storytelling is a great way to meet this expectations while still advancing your academic curriculum.

 

Storytelling in eLearning: The why and how — from eLearn Magazine by Shelley A. Gable

 

Rhianna Pratchett at TEDx Transmedia 2012 – ‘The Future of the Videogames Writer’

 

How to make RSA Animate style videos with your class… — from blogush.edublogs.org

 

30 compelling examples of visual storytelling on the web – from dtelepathy.com by Jessica Moon

Excerpt:

Storytelling is a powerful approach that can, when done right, compel users to convert more effectively than what any amount of optimization, crazy visual callouts, or awesome interactive elements can do otherwise. Much like how we expect to see a moral at the end of a book, we expect to find a purpose at the end of a site with a storytelling experience. When the path to the “moral of the story” (or conversion point, to be more specific) is laid out clearly in front of our users’ eyes, the rest of the work lies simply in convincing them that the purpose is really worth grabbing on to… which is great since with storytelling, a user is normally in the mindset of learning more about what the story has to offer. So take a look at the examples below and experience how their visual storytelling compels you to continue scrolling down their pages!

 

The Wider Image from Reuters — with thanks going out to Mr. Steven Chevalia for this find/resource

 

The Wider Image app from Reuters

 

Metaio unveils programming language for building augmented guide apps [VIDEO] — from tnooz.com by Sean O’Neill

 

Chemistry Project by 10th Grade Student Goes Viral [Video] — from ubergizmo.comby Pradeep Chandrasekaran

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Chemistry project goes viral -- great work Eli Cirino!

 

 

“Hollywood will be destroyed and no one will notice,” Wales said. But it won’t be Wikipedia (or Encarta) that kills the moviemaking industry: ” Collaborative storytelling and filmmaking will do to Hollywood what Wikipedia did to Encyclopedia Britannica,” he said.

– quote from Jimmy Wales to Hollywood: You’re Doomed (And Not Because of Piracy) at wired.com by Ryan Singel

 

Marco Tempest: A magical tale (with augmented reality) – TED Talks

Marco Tempest spins a beautiful story of what magic is, how it entertains us and how it highlights our humanity — all while working extraordinary illusions with his hands and an augmented reality machine.  A magician and illusionist for the 21st century, Marco Tempest blends cutting-edge technology with the flair and showmanship of Houdini.

 

Storybird

storybird.com -- for encouraging storytelling, art, literacy, creativity and more!

 

 

wevideo.com

WeVideo.com -- Using the cloud and digital video to bring stories to life

 

 

Web-based digital storytelling tools and online interactive resources — from Danny Maas at maasd.edublogs.org

 

 

Future of Storytelling Expert Series: CloudKid’s Founder on Interactive Storytelling for Children — from Latitude Research° by Kim Gaskins

Excerpt:

Recently, Latitude (in collaboration with Itizen) launched an innovation study on The Future of Storytelling. Why? So we can uncover the questions, challenges, and aspirations of tomorrow’s storytellers and identify how they can better align with audience’s changing expectations. Every week for the next several weeks, Latitude will share its conversation with a different influential individual. We’ll follow the series with a summary of best practices and insights for content creators and businesses from Latitude’s SVP, Neela Sakaria.

 

Living Actor™ Presenter is a new Web platform developed by Cantoche, an international company well known for its unique expertise in 3D avatar technological innovations.
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Film making for kids: Three great resources — from Literacy, families and learning blog by Trevor Cairney

 

Tagged with:  

FrogOS video walkthrough – The future of learning technology — from frogtrade

Excerpt:

Well here it is, two years in the making, 1000’s of man hours and finally we can proudly show you the new software we have been showcasing at Bett 2013.

FrogOS

What better way to whet your appetites than to give you a simple video walkthrough that shows you just how easy it is to create a site in FrogOS.

 

FrogOS-Feb2013

 

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Frog-Feb2013

 

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Frog2-Feb2013

 

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Frog3-Feb2013

A list of all the best iPad apps teachers need ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning / educatorstechnology.com

Excerpt:

We have been doing a lot of  reviews of educational  mobile apps. We particularly focused on the ones that work on iPad and we tried to cover almost all the fields from digital story telling to apps to teach creativity. Our purpose is to provide teachers with a repository of apps to choose from  when trying them with their students in the classroom. Check out the categories below and click on any title to access the correspondent apps it contains. Enjoy!

10 great apps for a teacher’s new iPad — from ipadapps4school.com by Richard Byrne

iPad resources, sources & tools — from GettingSmart.com by Tom Vander Ark

edapps.ca

The iPad: A useful resource to help students with learning disabilities — from utorbright.com

Excerpt:

Story Builder
Math Bingo
Proloquo2Go
Super Duper: What Are They Thinking
Conversation Builder

To better understand how the iPad can positively impact a child’s learning experience, here is a video of a nine year-old boy named Leo who is using an iPad app called First Words. Leo has autism but he is doing exceptionally well with spelling and pairing pictures with words.

Further references mentioned:
http://www.squidoo.com/ipad-for-autism

http://www.cnn.com/2012/05/14/tech/gaming-gadgets/ipad-autism/index.html

 

Also see:

 

30 compelling examples of visual storytelling on the web — from dtelepathy.com by Jessica Moon

Excerpt:

Storytelling is a powerful approach that can, when done right, compel users to convert more effectively than what any amount of optimization, crazy visual callouts, or awesome interactive elements can do otherwise. Much like how we expect to see a moral at the end of a book, we expect to find a purpose at the end of a site with a storytelling experience. When the path to the “moral of the story” (or conversion point, to be more specific) is laid out clearly in front of our users’ eyes, the rest of the work lies simply in convincing them that the purpose is really worth grabbing on to… which is great since with storytelling, a user is normally in the mindset of learning more about what the story has to offer. So take a look at the examples below and experience how their visual storytelling compels you to continue scrolling down their pages!

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