Why mobile learning is the future of workplace learning [infographic by UpsideLearning; as found on wiredacademic.com]

From DSC:
Here’s a portion of the infographic that I want to highlight — look at how many streams of content are flowing by (perfect for building one’s own learning ecosystem!)

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informal-learning-portion-April-2013

 

 I would add augmented reality-based apps
to the on-demand and embedded areas as well…

.

What's the best way to deal with ever-changing streams of content? When information has shrinking half-lives?

Jay’s Informal Learning Super Deck — from internettime.com by Jay Cross; thanks Jay for sharing this information/these slides

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JayCross-FormalInformalSpectrum2013

 From  slide 169/370

 

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JayCross-LearningEcosystem2013

 From  slide 225/370

 

From DSC:
As I mentioned the other day…perhaps helping folks build their own learning ecosystems — based upon one’s gifts/abilities/passions — should be an objective for teachers, professors, instructional designers, trainers, and consultants alike. No matter whether we’re talking K-12, higher ed, or corporate training, these ever-changing networks/tools/strategies will help keep us marketable and able to contribute in a variety of areas to society.

Thanks again Jay for sharing this information/these slides with us!

Why are organizations wringing their hands over informal learning instead of doing something about it? — from internettime.com by Jay Cross
A Google+ Hangout with Craig Wiggings, Charles Jennings, Enzo Silva, Pascal le Rudulier, Clark Quinn, and Jay Cross.

Excerpt:

Learning industry should pay more attention to:

  • Informal Learning
  • Competencies
  • Leadership learning
  • Measurement
  • Mobile learning technologies

 

Learning Insights Report 2012 — from Kineo and elearningage.co.uk

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Actual report here:

Learning Insights Report 2012 -- from Kineo and elearningage.co.uk

 

Learning in a Social Organization (LISO): a clickable guide — from  by Jane Hart

From DSC:
A great picture of a dynamic, active, practical, constantly-changing, learning ecosystem:

 


Learning in a SocialOrganization (LISO) -- from Jane Hart - September 2012

 


The new workplace — from internettime.com by Jay Cross

Excerpt (emphasis by DSC):

Six years ago few people believed that informal learning made much of a difference. Today’s common wisdom is that most workplace learning is experiential, unplanned, social, and informal.

Informal learning tops many training department agendas. Companies are attracted by the low price tag. However, few of them are doing much systematically. They’ve converted a few programs but they’ve failed to improve their learning ecosystems.

We’ve shifted how we think about learning since the Informal Learning book came out. It’s a new ball game and we need to play by new rules. Consider what’s changed…

From DSC:
If this is the case, what could/should that mean for those of us working within higher education?

Survey shows people take training as infrequently as they go to a conference; but they learn continuously in other ways — from Learning in the Social Workplace by Jane Hart

Excerpt:

Although there are probably few surprises in the responses to the four main questions themselves, it is when you view the amalgamated results that you can see the bigger picture.

Addendum on 5/17/12 from Learning TRENDS by Elliott Masie – May 9, 2012 | #722 – Updates on Learning, Business & Technology.

Results of Learning Directions Pulse Survey

* 33% of organizations reported they are SHRINKING the use of face-to-face classrooms.
* Greatest planned growth in learning activity mode is in the use of Webinars.
* Strongest interest in change and updates was in Leadership Development.
* While 40% show a strong interest in Social Learning – only 20.1% plan a growing utilization with a strong piloting base.
* Mobile and Tablet Device use for Learning is being piloted by 30.1%


Social media and its impact on how we learn in the workplace — from C4PLT by Jane Hart


 

From DSC:
One reflection that jumped out at me from Jane’s excellent presentation…and that I believe is a universal truth:

If an organization doesn’t respond to changing conditions, needs, desires, preferences, best interests, and/or the requirements of its customers, that organization will diminish in usefulness and will most likely (albeit eventually) go out of business.

I know I’m not introducing a new thought here and the above statement seems very self-evident, but do we heed this advice in corporate L&D? Corporate IT? IT within higher education? In higher education as an industry?

 


Why we need less instruction — from Clive on Learning by Clive Sheperd

Excerpt:

Another reason you might back away from instruction as a strategy is because it is more efficient to provide how-to materials at the point-of-need – it isn’t learning that’s required, it’s performance support:

 

Information flow150x282

A question of balance — by Clive Sheperd
Excerpt:

The issue, as ever, is getting the balance right between taking advantage of new developments as they come available, while continuing to exploit the potential of long-standing approaches.

 

slider20percentf2f-online

 

slider20percentfsynch-asynch

 

slider20percentformal-informal

 

slider20percentcourses-resources

 

Excellent resource for understanding the basics of a various learning theories!

From DSC:
I’d like to thank:

  • Doug Lynch, Dr. Stanton Wortham, and Elliott Masie for recording these videos and for sharing their insights/expertise
  • The University of Pennsylvania for making these items available
  • Capella University for including the above resource in a course that I’m currently taking from Dr. Katherine Emmons entitled, “Learning Theory and the Educational Process.”

2/8/11:
Note/correction from my original posting:

Doug Lynch and Stanton Wortham are not at Penn State, but rather they are at the University of Pennsylvania; Elliot Masie is an Adjunct Faculty Member at the University of Pennsylvania.

eLearning predictions for 2011 and beyond — from Web Courseworks.com by Jon Aleckson

Excerpts:

This summer I attended the 2010 Distance Teaching and Learning Conference in Madison, Wisconsin. Some very interesting topics came up in the facilitated Think Tanks, and I wanted to share some of the predictions that were developed from these active group discussions regarding where eLearning will go in the next ten years.

Below you will find a table that summarizes the different opportunities and challenges that were predicted to arise in the next ten years by the participants in the conference Think Tanks and by [Jon Aleckson].

Opportunities Challenges
Learner
  1. Bridging informal and formal education
  2. Movement between schools to obtain courses needed for custom degrees
  3. Increase in shared knowledge among students and learners
  4. Networking and learning from each other
  5. Resumes will include informal and formal learning experiences acquired via the Internet
  1. Developing standards to gauge education and competency from multiple sources
  2. Providing an authoritative, reliable source for information (e.g. not just Wikipedia)
  3. Physical and psychological distance from other learners and instructors.
  4. Quality measures for informal and formal professional development attained on the Internet.
K-12 Instruction
  1. Reducing barriers to funding, certification, credit and accreditation
  2. Increase access to quality education for all students
  3. Open “course” concept to new blends of delivery and teaching
  4. Providing for more game-based learning experiences and techniques for a variety of learning styles
  5. Using new technology in the classroom
  1. Defining online and blended education
  2. Development of technical infrastructure, internet access and equipment
  3. Maintaining the custodial function of school
  4. Acquiring funding for bold Internet delivered experiences for the classroom
  5. Allowing use of new technology in the classroom
Corporate Training
  1. Just-in-time learning
  2. Greater access to information
  3. Peer coaching
  4. Cloud training
  5. Ability to reach those previously unreachable
  1. Intellectual property rights
  2. Resistance to using open content
  3. Peer review of resources
  4. Unknown impact of open universities
  5. Technical challenges related to size of offerings and rapidly changing technology
Content
  1. Tools allowing for easier collaboration and interaction
  2. Richer media experience (videos and simulations)
  3. Content repositories & Learning Object distribution and searchability
  4. Movement away from static textbooks as primary resource
  1. Growing tension between standard core content and differentiation of content
  2. Where will content for curriculum come from?
  3. What part will student-generated content play?
  4. More copyright issues
Learning Environment
  1. Customized learning spaces, i.e. personal learning environments (PLEs)
  2. Customization of content presentation and access
  3. eReaders and eBooks providing better and more interactive content (just in time)
  4. Changing paradigm of “bounded courses” to unbounded courses where learning is a continuous process that can occur anywhere and at any time
  1. Determining fit and purpose of new tools and pedagogical approaches
  2. Standards for smart phones/mobile apps
  3. Issues with accreditation, privacy and copyrights
  4. Universal access to technology, equipment, and the internet
Faculty
  1. More involvement and collaboration with online and distance learning initiatives
  2. More part-time faculty teaching for several institutions
  3. Faculty practices and entrepreneurs
  4. Changing role of faculty and PD instructors
  1. What will the primary role of faculty be?
  2. Faculty segmentation into master teachers, mentors, researchers, tutors, etc.
  3. Changing of promotion and tenure to accommodate different roles
  4. Changing pay structure
Administration
&
Management
  1. Continued growth of open education with some program stabilization
  2. Improved learner focus
  3. Increased blending/blurring of traditional on-campus with online options
  4. More collaboration with other administrators to influence policy makers
  1. Managing and maintaining growth
  2. How to blend on and off campus learner programs
  3. Regulatory and accreditation issues
  4. Student accountability issues (plagiarism/doctoring)
  5. Improving faculty/ instructor readiness
International Perspectives
  1. Providing access to education even to remote, rural, and developing areas
  2. Promote intercultural mixing and diversity through education
  3. Improving educational access in segregated societies
  4. Sharing resources and co-producing content to reduce cost
  5. Serve new growing customer groups
  6. Informal learning, sharing own learning with others via internet (e.g. blogs, wiki)
  1. Technological infrastructure of societies
  2. Understanding of different people and places
  3. Eliminating the “we and they” thinking
  4. Illiterate audiences
  5. International/cultural conflicts
  6. Developing culturally aware curricula
  7. Differences in cost of education and fees
  8. Selecting suitable types of content delivery
  9. Refiguring content for different learner communities

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