From DSC:
When I first saw the graphs (below) from Mary Meeker’s 2012 KPCB Internet Trends Year-End Update — as a technologist — my mind/focus went to the increasing pace of change/adoption of technologies. But another way to view these graphs would be to ask:

 

What does this say about society’s expectations? About society’s use of technology?
Are folks willing to wait around as long as they used to? Apparently, not as much these days.

.

 

RateOfAdoption1-Meeker2013

 

.

RateOfAdoption2-Meeker2013

 

.

RateOfAdoption3-Meeker2013

 

Inside look: Learning spaces — from University Business by Kristen Domonell
Meeting classroom teaching and collaboration expectations

Excerpt:

Gone are the days when a basic classroom with a podium and desks was considered an acceptable learning space. In fact, according to CDW-G’s “Learn Now, Lecture Later” report released in June 2012, 47 percent of instructors surveyed said they are moving beyond the lecture-only model. In addition, 71 percent of students and 77 percent of instructors said they use more classroom technology than just two years ago.

Key trends identified in the “2012 Horizon Report,” a collaboration between the New Media Consortium and the Educause Learning Initiative, include the shift in education paradigms to include online learning, hybrid learning, and the collaborative model; a new emphasis in the classroom on more challenge-based and active learning; and a change in the way student projects are structured, driven by the increasingly collaborative work world.

Here are examples of how institutions are adapting to these shifting trends by creating learning spaces that foster innovative thinking and collaboration—and prepare students for the future.

.

UnivBus-LearningSpaces-Feb2013

Latitude looking to kids for technology innovation — from technapex.com by Caity Doyle

 

 

Excerpt:

On their website, Latitude explains why they made the interesting choice to reach out to children for new ideas in technology:

Young people shouldn’t be merely passive recipients of media and technology, as they’re often thought to be — rather, they should be active participants in imagining and creating the future of the Web. Why? Because “digital natives” have a more intuitive relationship with new technologies than many adults have, and because they have different expectations about technology. They instinctively expect it to respond to them in very human-like ways — to motivate and empower them, often serving as a sort of companion, rather than merely a tool for solving specific problems.

Aerohive ships Bonjour Gateway, an Apple mobile device management enrollment solution and 2 new 802.11n Access Points — from marketwatch.com

Excerpt:

SUNNYVALE, Calif., Jul 23, 2012 (BUSINESS WIRE) — Aerohive Networks, the pioneer in controller-less Wi-Fi and cloud-enabled enterprise networking, today announced the general availability of its HiveOS 5.1 and HiveManager 5.1. These new upgraded systems provide several significant enhancements including Bonjour Gateway and recently announced JAMF Software Mobile Device Management (MDM) integration for more granular control and management of customers’ BYOD dilemma and advanced reporting dashboards to help reduce troubleshooting.
In addition to the release of 5.1, Aerohive is delivering two new 802.11n access points (APs): AP121 and AP141. Designed to provide greater throughput and coverage, these two new APs are offered at a cost-effective price point ideal for education, healthcare, retail and distributed enterprise environments.

Cisco to unveil Apple Bonjour gateway for enterprise WiFi networks — from techworld.com by John Cox
Cisco joins rivals in giving Apple’s discovery protocol enterprise behaviours

Excerpt:

[July 24] Cisco plans to add code to its wireless LAN controllers to make Apple’s Bonjour-based technologies like AirPlay and AirPrint better behaved on enterprise networks. The code will turn the controller into a Bonjour gateway, and couple this with policy-based end user privileges. For users, this will mean that Apple clients will be able to find and access network-attached AirPrint printers, Apple TVs and the like on different subnets, so everything will just work as it does on their own home networks. A second expected result will be a big decrease in the amount of Bonjour-based discovery traffic that today is putting a heavy load on enterprise nets teeming with Apples MacBook laptops, iPhones, iPads and more.

ARUBA AIRGROUP™: Get your Wi-FI ready for AirPrint and AirPlay

Making AirPlay, AirPrint work in large scale WLANs — from community.arubanetworks.com by genieki
.

Screen Shot 2012-03-22 at 5.13.34 AM.png

 

 

From DSC:
I hope to use these sorts of tools to enable students to seamless contribute content to the classroom-based discussions. However, this IT-related item is not just relevant to the K-12 and higher ed worlds, but also to the corporate world as well.
.

A piece of the Next Generation Smart Classroom -- Daniel Christian -- June 2012


 

Higher Ed Tech" Where K-12 & Consumer Collide - Frank Catalano - March 2012

 

Excerpt:

What’s our agenda? It’s basically in three parts:

  1. What student expectations are
  2. Where innovation is coming from and what’s driving it
  3. And what it’s developing into over the next three years – in 5 transcendent trends that span K-20

 

Also see:

When Technologies Collide: Consumer, K-12 and Higher Ed -- by Frank Catalano -- April 2012

Digital learning: What kids really want — from The Journal by Chris Riedel

Excerpt:

According to [Project Tomorrow CEO Julie] Evans, the data from those surveys indicated that students:

  • Have a growing interest in social-based learning;
  • Want to connect with and develop a personal network of expert resources;
  • Are looking for tools that increase untethered learning; and
  • Want a digitally rich learning environment, unencumbered by traditional rules.

Also:

Other things students at all grade levels are looking for include access to online tutoring, the ability to take online classes, access to real-word data and databases, greater access to teachers using SMS/text messaging, education-based virtual reality and games, and increased access to digital collaboration tools.

Designing learning spaces to meet the changing learning needs and expectations of students and staff -- from University of Canberra by Helen Carter & Danny Munnerley

.

.

.

Facilities include:

  • Open lounge – An informal space where you can hold ad-hoc or planned gatherings, whilst still having access to screens or projectors to share work and ideas together. There are skype enabled screens, wireless audio, printing facilities, hot water for tea & coffee or chilled water for filling your water bottle. WIFI is available throughout.
  • Common Spaces 1& 2 – Meeting, presentation or discussion space equipped with an interactive data projector and writable Idea-paint walls, capacity 12-20 (depending on layout)
  • Hothouse Studio – Meeting, presentation or discussion space equipped with interactive data projector and writable Idea-paint walls, capacity 18-26 (depending on layout)
  • Sessional staff office – An open office that provides 3 workstations for staff or sessionals to use for temporary office space, available on a first come basis.

iPad-crazed toddlers spur holiday sales — from bloomberg.com by Adam Satariano and Katie Linsell

 

From DSC:

  • From any administrator’s and instructional technologist’s standpoint, this relates to students’ expectations — whether that be in elementary, secondary, or postsecondary learning environments. This also relates to the corporate world as students make their way through their educations and then hit the workplace. They will bring their expectations with them. Are we ready to meet them where they are at?

 

 

Tagged with:  

Cisco Connected World Technology Report

From DSC: Expectations, today, are getting hard to beat

Since Apple’s event yesterday, I’ve heard some conversations on the radio and reviewed several blog postings and articles about Apple’s announcements…many with a sense of let down (and some with the usual critical viewpoints by the backseat drivers out there who have never tried to invent anything, but who sure like to find fault with everyone else’s inventions and innovations).

It made me reflect on how high our expectations are becoming these days!  It wasn’t enough that iCloud is coming on 10/12 (and who knows the directions that will take society in). It wasn’t enough to introduce some serious software-based innovations such as Siri (which bring some significant advancements in the world of artificial intelligence) or AirPlay for the iPhone.  It wasn’t enough to enter into the multi-billion dollar card industry with their new Cards app for the iPhone.  Wow…tough crowd.

What might these announcements — and expectations — mean for education? 
Well…I can see intelligent tutoring, intelligent agents, machine-to-machine communications, the continued growth of mobile learning, learning from the living room, the initiation of programs/events caused by changes in one’s location, continued convergence of the television/computer/telephone, continued use of videoconferencing on handheld devices, cloud-based textbooks/apps, and more.


 

Siri on the iPhone 4S -- October 4, 2011

 

 

 

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!

© 2019 | Daniel Christian