iBooksAuthor-JAMF-SW-June2013

 

Description
Self Publishing Using iBooks Author is aimed towards introducing you to using to Apple’s powerful eBook authoring software, the new possibilities it provides, and help start you on the path to creating your very own books to share and distribute.

Being an eBook about iBooks Author, created using iBooks Author, we will take advantage of this and  explore every facet of this software while demonstrating on the pages how we went about creating the layouts and designs you see using iBooks Author’s many features.

Free.
Available on iPad.

unbound-Matt-MacInnis-Feb2013

 

Some notes from DSC — with thanks to Mr. Steven Chevalia for the initial resource/video:

Changes in the past were mainly about the methods of getting knowledge onto paper.

Only 3 key medium changes

  1. Oral speaking/tradition to writing
  2. Writing to print
  3. Print to electronic

But now, the traditional book model is coming unbound.

Amazon.com:

  • Controls customers — 30% of books sold through them
  • Controls product – forced to build products that are a $10 text model

Inkling is introducing two main changes to get away from that empire’s methods of doing business:

  1. A way to build for the medium — Inkling Habitat  — “The only collaborative publishing environment designed for professionals.”
  2. A new way to discover and sell your materials (which uses normal Google searches vs having to go through Amazon.com) — Inkling’s Content Discovery Platform

 

Inkling-CDP-Jan2013

 

The object formerly known as the textbook– from The Chronicle by Jeff Young

.

Don't Call Them Textbooks 1

Holly Gressley for The Chronicle

 

Excerpt:

Textbook publishers argue that their newest digital products shouldn’t even be called “textbooks.” They’re really software programs built to deliver a mix of text, videos, and homework assignments. But delivering them is just the beginning. No old-school textbook was able to be customized for each student in the classroom. The books never graded the homework. And while they contain sample exam questions, they couldn’t administer the test themselves.

One publisher calls its products “personalized learning experiences,” another “courseware,” and one insists on using its own brand name, “MindTap.” For now, this new product could be called “the object formerly known as the textbook.”

 

From DSC:
Imagine how this sort of thing might fit into the “chalkboard of the future” — as applications and content flow onto the “board” from open source repositories and/or from the publishers’ cloud-based repositories of content…

.

Daniel Christian: The Chalkboard of the Future

.

or in learning from the living room…

.

The Living [Class] Room -- by Daniel Christian -- July 2012 -- a second device used in conjunction with a Smart/Connected TV

 

Also see:

7th graders publish their own textbook — from learninginhand.com by Tony Vincent

 

 

Also see:

  • Readz launches to provide publishers DIY solution to optimize content for tablets — from betakit.com by Humayun Khan
    .
  • 7 outstanding free books for your iPad — from educatorstechnology.com
    Excerpt:
    Below is a list of some excellent books for your iPad. I have curated this list over  the last couple of months and I kept adding to it every time I stumble upon a resource somewhere online.I don’t know if you like reading books on your iPad or not but let me tell you this: having at least a couple of titles installed on your iPad would really be of great help particularly in those moments when you are stuck somewhere and have nothing to do but waiting. Reading is a habit ( luckily a good one ) that we can ACQUIRE  by force of habituation at least in the eyes of Skinnerian theory.The more you read , the fluent you get at reading and the more used your mind becomes to the act of reading.  Check out these books I selected for you. All of them are free and require iBooks. Enjoy.

 

Addendum on 1/22/13:

From DSC:
The other day, I mentioned how important it will be for institutions of higher education to increase the priority of experimentation. Clicking on the graphic below will give you an example of the kind of vision/experiment that I’m talking about.

(Though, more practically speaking, to operationalize this type of vision would actually require a series of much smaller experiments; I just wanted to present the overall vision of how these pieces might fit together).

 

DanielChristian--Jan2013-Experiment-with-Apples-Ecosystem

NOTE:
This 11″x17″ image is a 10MB PDF file, so it may take some time to appear.
Feel free to right-click on the graphic in order to download/save/print the file as well.

 

Also relevant is this upcoming event from educause:

 

1/8/13 addendum resulting from a Tweet from a great colleague, Mr. Travis LaFleur (@travislafleur), UX Designer at BiggsGilmore

 

 

The education giant adapts — from MIT Technology Review by Jessica Leber
Pearson is the world’s largest book publisher. Now it wants to be a one-stop shop for digital education.

Excerpt:

Pearson pulled this off with a decade-long string of acquisitions that helped it shift its emphasis from selling books to selling education services. The London-based company styles itself as the “world’s leading learning company,” even if that learning isn’t delivered through traditional books. These days, Pearson is more like an IT department for classrooms and schools. It sells technology infrastructure, software, and consulting services to schools—services that in turn help deliver the vast stock of textbook content Pearson owns. The company says its revenue from online content and services will surpass those of the traditional publishing business this year.

From DSC:
I congratulate Pearson on reinventing itself.  The words of Steve Jobs ring in my mind…something about cannibalizing one’s business before someone else does it for you.  Several other words and phrases come to my mind after seeing the above article — that regular readers of this blog and my archived website will instantly recognize:

  • Dangers of the status quo
  • Staying relevant
  • Survival
  • Disruption/change
  • New business models
  • Game-changing environment
  • Using teams of specialists

Also relevant here/see:

 

26 iBooks Author how-to videos — from freetech4teachers.com by Richard Byrne

Also see:

.

 

 

Also see:

 

Addendum on 11/19/12:

.

tablo.com.au

Key quote/lesson from “How Barnes & Noble destroyed itself” — from fool.com by John Maxfield

An unnecessary tragedy
What makes B&N’s story tragic from a shareholder’s and book-lover’s perspective is that it wasn’t inevitable. The company would be in an entirely different position if its leadership hadn’t pooh-poohed online retail in the late 1990s, when the now-dominant Amazon was in its infancy. Consider this from its 1998 annual report: “Although it is clear the World Wide Web, with its profound possibilities, will become a major component of the future of bookselling and publishing, we believe retail bookstores will remain the foundation of our industry . . . shopping and browsing in a bookstore is an irreplaceable experience, and it is woven securely into the fabric of our American culture [emphasis added].”

From DSC:
I love going to B&N; sipping some coffee and reading a book. So don’t get me wrong, I really enjoy the physical experience of going to a bookstore. But the lesson for higher ed — as well as for the corporate world — is that technology cannot be pooh-poohed and shoved aside.  Those who do so will be very sorry that they chose that route. There can be danger in pursuing the status quo.

How about your organization…is there solid representation of technology on your board/executive suite/leadership team?

My last thought here relates to my posting  What happens in our hearts has very practical, relevant implications in our daily lives

In 2009, the company paid its chairman of the board, Len Riggio, nearly $600 million for B&N College, an amalgamation of campus-based bookstores that controlled the rights to the parent company’s trade name and was then owned by Riggio and his wife.

At the time, it looked like a classic covetous overreach by an executive to extract capital without selling shares. When all that’s left of B&N is a Harvard case study, however, my guess is that this blatant display of avarice and disregard for minority shareholders will be characterized more ominously as the proverbial straw that broke the camel’s back.

.

Also relevant here:

Citia: Reinventing the reading experience

citia.com

 

  • Created with some of the world’s best writers and publishers
  • More knowledge in less time: serious nonfiction titles, beautifully condensed
  • Two levels of summary—high altitude and detailed
  • Curated rich media, info graphics, and photography
  • ‘Card’-based reading system moves e-reading beyond the PDF format
  • Intuitive, grounded navigation (say goodbye to “location 2,077”!!)
  • New 3D table of contents organizes books by concept
  • Helps you sample books and buy the ones you really want to read
  • Skip over material you already understand, focusing on new ideas
  • Radical new format designed for speed and sharing
  • Share extended, formatted samples via Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and email
  • A killer app for time-challenged executives
  • Includes referrals to related books

 

 

Tagged with:  

EBook Revenues Beat Hardcovers For The First Time — from techcrunch.com by John Biggs

Excerpt:

The Association of American Publishers released a report today that shows that ebooks have beaten hardcover revenues for the first time. Ebook revenues topped out at $282.3 million YTD while hardcovers hit $229.6. Almost exactly a year ago the tables were turned with ebooks hitting $220 million and hardcovers brushing past $335 million.

Paying for Performance — from InsideHigherEd.com by Steve Kolowich

Excerpt:

Now one university is working with a major educational content company to shift some of that accountability from the institutions that enroll students in courses to the companies that supply them with educational texts and tutoring software.

Are apps the future of book publishing? — from forbes.com by Alex Knapp

Excerpt:

It’s no surprise, then, that publishers are turning to the app as a possible product for books moving forward.  This has led to another movement towards enhanced books, particularly as apps for iPhone, Android, and other tablets. Are tablet apps the book of the future? In order to find out, I talked to authors, publishers, and app programmers, and read more than a few book apps.

Rafter™ launches to revolutionize the entire course materials process for students, educators, and administrators, making education more affordable, accessible and effective — from Rafter
Rafter Delivers First-of-its-Kind Technology to Manage Textbooks and Digital Content On Campus and Online

 Excerpt:

SAN MATEO, CA–(Marketwire – Feb 28, 2012) – Rafter today launched as a new education technology company offering a network of software services that enable administrators and educators to better control costs and manage course materials for their students. Addressing higher education course materials management at an enterprise level, the Rafter Course Materials Network™ is the first suite of cloud-based software services that helps reduce costs for students and stores, helps educators discover and adopt the best materials, and provides college administrators with unprecedented power to control the complexities and reduce the costs of the entire course materials management process.

Rafter evolved out of one of the fastest growing education technology companies, textbook rental company BookRenter, which has saved millions of students more than $175 million across more than 5,000 campuses nationwide. In 2010, the company began to partner directly with schools to co-develop services to reduce the cost of and improve the experience associated with textbooks. Today, more than 500 schools have adopted BookRenter’s solution.

.

See also:.

.

rafter.com

.

Also see:

Who decides what gets sold in the bookstore? — from paidcontent.org by Seth Godin

Excerpt:

I just found out that Apple is rejecting my new manifesto Stop Stealing Dreams and won’t carry it in their store because inside the manifesto are links to buy the books [at Amazon.com] I mention in the bibliography.

 

From DSC:
By the way, some nice quotes from the Stop Stealing Dreams page:

  • The economy has changed, probably forever.  School hasn’t.
    .
  • Our kids are too important to sacrifice to the status quo.

The Digital Classroom
Via:
Accredited Online Universities Guide

Addendum on 2/14/12 — also see:

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!

© 2019 | Daniel Christian