What audiences want: Study uncovers possible futures for storytelling — from latd.com by Kim Gaskins

Excerpt:

Earlier this year, Latitude set out to understand audiences’ evolving expectations around their everyday content experiences—with TV shows, movies, books, plot-driven video games, news, and even advertising. We began by speaking with leaders in the emerging “transmedia” space to investigate the challenges and the opportunities that today’s storytellers are encountering.

Then we asked 158 early adopters from across the world how they’d like to experience stories in the future. During the course of a generative, online survey, participants were asked to play the role of producer; they chose a narrative (a book, movie, TV show, plot-driven video games, news story, etc.) that they know well and re-invented how audiences might experience that story. Some of the ideas participants suggested are possible today even if they don’t exist yet—while others require technologies that are still several years coming.

 

 

 

Videos from Qualcomm Uplinq 2012 show the future of Smart TV
— from hexus.net by Mark Tyson

Excerpt:
Here are the feature highlights of these “redefined” Smart TVs:

  • Console quality gaming
  • Concurrency of apps
  • Miracast wireless technology allowing smartphone and tablet screens to partake in multi-screen interactivity
  • Personalisation and facial recognition
  • Gestures
  • HD picture quality
  • HD video calling

 

From DSC:
…and add to that list the power of customized learning and analytics!

YouTube Video of  Marc Whitten, VP Xbox LIVE

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SmartGlass -- from Microsoft -- June 4, 2012

 

Microsoft Unveils ‘SmartGlass’ to Connect Xbox and Windows — from the Wall Street Journal

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Xbox Marc Whitten, corporate vice president of Xbox LIVE, announces
Xbox SmartGlass onstage at the Xbox 360 E3 media briefing Monday.

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Also see:

Addendum 6/6/12:

From DSC:
As the massive convergence of the computer, the telephone, and the television continues, other trends are also taking place that may eventually impact how we interact with educationally-related content.  That is, the main screen of our living rooms might be delivering a 5-10 minute “lecture”, but our tablets and smart phones may be in our laps as we interact around this content with others. 

Along these lines, as transmedia storytelling develops, the use of multiple devices and methods to consume and contribute to content may be setting the stages for how things can get done with more educationally-related applications.

Consider this excerpt from Complex TV: Transmedia Storytelling — by Jason Mittell, Associate Professor of American Studies and Film & Media Culture at Middlebury College:

As television series have become more complex in their narrative strategies, television itself has expanded its scope across a number of screens and platforms, complicating notions of medium-specificity at the very same time that television seems to have a clearer sense of distinct narrative form. This chapter explores how television narratives are expanded and complicated through transmedia extensions, including video games, novelizations, websites, online video, and alternate reality games. With specific analyses of transmedia strategies for Lost and Breaking Bad, I consider how television’s transmedia storytelling is grappling with issues of canonicity and audience segmentation, how transmedia reframes viewer expectations for the core television serial, and what transmedia possibilities might look like going forward.

 

Also relevant/see:

  • Please don’t ruin the second screen — from techcrunch.com by Somrat Niyogi
    Excerpt:
    The second screen space is going to be a multi-billion dollar market. Just last week, Tim Cook announced that 67M iPads were sold in less than two years. It took more than 24 years to sell that many Macs.  With the growing trend of second screen activity (i.e. using tablets while you watch TV), there is bound to be major disruption in the TV industry.
  • Comcast connects Skype HD videoconferencing to the living room TV — from networkworld.com by Larry Hettick
    Excerpt:
    With the Skype on Xfinity service customers will also be able to:
    • Make and receive Skype-to-Skype video and audio calls or send instant messages via Skype on a TV while watching their favorite TV show at the same time, and accept incoming Skype calls during a TV show with the help of Caller ID.
    • Import Skype friends into a global address book which can also contain Facebook, Outlook, Gmail and smartphone contacts so subscribers can find friends who already use Skype and see when contacts are online and available to talk.
    • Communicate with the hundreds of millions of connected Skype users around the globe, whether on a Skype-enabled TV, PC or mobile device.
  • A TV platform so disruptive everyone’s suing it — from fastcompany.com by David Zax
    Excerpt:
    We chat with Chet Kanojia of Aereo, the new TV-where-and-when-you-want-it service that has a few legal troubles. Could Aereo finally disrupt the loathed cable bundle–and TV altogether?
  • Now serving the latest in exponential growth: YouTube!— from singularityhub.com by David J. Hill.
    .

Addendum on 6/2/12

Animator creates incredible musical painting with $5 iPad app [VIDEO] — from Mashable by Christine Erickson

Excerpt:

“I really recommend it to anyone who does storyboards, concept art and animators, filmmakers, producers, whatever — this is the future,” says the video’s lead animator and director, Whitney Alexander. (You can see the full making-of here.)

Also see:

NBC News launches interactive e-book publishing venture — from pcmag.com by Adario Strange

Excerpt:

NBC News plans to launch NBC Publishing, a venture dedicated to releasing interactive e-books for tablets and e-readers.

From DSC:
Some items that caught my eye (so far) from CES 2012:

  • CES 2012: The convergence of TV and mobile platforms — from readwriteweb.com by Dan Rowinski
    …mobile operating systems are on a path to fundamentally change how content is delivered.
    .
  • Prepare yourself: Kinect is coming to Windows Feb. 1 — from Mashable.com by Sarah Kessler
    .
  • LG unveils giant 84″ TV with voice, gesture control — from Mashable.com by Samantha Murphy

    .
  • Introducing The MakerBot Replicator™
    January 10, 2012 (Brooklyn, NY) – MakerBot Industries is excited to announce the launch of its latest product, The MakerBot Replicator™, which will debut at CES in Las Vegas, NV on Tuesday, January 10th.  The MakerBot Replicator™ is the ultimate personal 3D printer, with MakerBot Dualstrusion™ (2-color printing) and a bigger printing footprint, giving you the superpower to print things BIG! Assembled in Brooklyn by skilled technicians, the MakerBot Replicator™ is ready within minutes to start printing right out of the box. Starting at $1749, The MakerBot Replicator™ is an affordable, open source 3D printer that is compact enough to sit on your desktop. Want to print in two colors? Choose the Dualstrusion™ option!
    .
  • USA Network taps Yap.tv for branded social TV app
    Yap.tv said the deal will make it the first independent social TV developer to create a custom-branded version of its app for the iPad and iPhone for a major network.??
    NEW YORK – NBCUniversal’s USA Network has partnered with Yap.tv, a maker of a social TV guide app for mobile devices, to launch a USA-branded app for its shows and fans as it and other channels continue to expand the use of social media to reach and engage viewers.
    .
  • Samsung unveils a motion-controlled TV and the U.S. Galaxy Note [PICS]— from Mashable.com by Sarah Kessler
    During its keynote address at CES on Monday, Samsung unveiled a connected TV with voice and gesture recognition, WiFi-enabled cameras and its thinnest ultrabook yet. It also introduced its Galaxy Note smartphone to the U.S. for the first time.

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  • Coincident announces ScreenSync TV Technology — from marketwatch.com
    New solution allows companies to create interactive experiences for viewers that synchronize their tablets with shows they are watching on their televisions
    .
    Also see:
    .

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The Evolving Digital Ecosystem - from Moxie's Trends for 2012

  • The Always On Web
  • Web of Things
  • Big Data
  • Next Gen Search
  • Mobile Sharing
  • Mobile Social Activism
  • Impulse Commerce
  • Brands As Partners
  • The New Living Room  <– From DSC: This is one of those key areas that I’m trying to keep a pulse check on for re: our learning ecosystems of the future 
  • Personal Data Security

 

Also see:

 

Tagged with:  

Count on Apple iTV in 2012, analyst says — from technewsdaily.com by Leslie Meredith

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apple+tv-100604-02

 

Excerpt:

  • The rumors that Apple will launch an actual TV have hit the headlines again following comments made today (Nov. 30) by analyst Gene Munster at an industry conference. Munster went so far as to tell his audience at the Ignition: Future of Media conference in New York City to wait to buy a new TV, because Apple’s TV is “going to be awesome.”

Addendum on 12/2/11: 

Next on TV: Data driven programming — from wired.co.uk by Matt Locke

Excerpt:

Quiz shows such as The Million Pound Drop Live on Channel 4 use real-time data from hundreds of thousands of online players to feed interesting stats and observations to host Davina McCall. [From DSC: What if this related to an online-based learning exercise/class/module/training session?]

This is the real revolution that is about to hit TV production — data is moving off the servers and in front of the cameras. With this comes a new generation of creative talent — data storytellers for whom the spreadsheet is as important as a script when it comes to content. TV is no longer stuck behind the screen — around 60 per cent of people in the UK watch with a “second screen” (a mobile or laptop) at the same time, and a lot of them are talking online about what they’re watching. TV is now back in the crowd, and if you make, commission or distribute content right now, you’d better learn to love data, and fast.

Also see:

  • What comes after Siri? A web that talks back — from gigaom.com by Stacey Higginbotham
    Siri may be the hottest personal assistant since I Dream of Jeannie, but Apple’s artificial intelligence is only the tip of the iceberg as we combine ubiquitous connectivity, sensor networks, big data and new methods of AI and programming into a truly connected network.
  • Ball State University Center for Media Design to Host Workshop Session — from thetvoftomorrowshow.com
    Entitled “Researching the Second Screen and Social Viewing: Two Recent Studies,” the workshop will see CMD researchers summarizing the findings from: 1) an eye-tracking study of viewers’ distribution of visual attention between the TV and second screen during use of two commercially released second-screen apps; and 2) a study of show-specific Twitter traffic rates during programming and ad pods for multiple episodes of three shows from different genres.

DIYDays in LA — from ChristineWeitbrecht.com

Excerpt:

Needless to say, today’s workshops at DIYDays LA were filled to the brim with great speakers and innovative perspectives. For those that couldn’t attend today’s workshops, here’s a re-cap of the most important bits:

Common Points
There were a few common themes mentioned in almost every talk I attended, and they were all based on experiences (good and bad) from existing projects…

People mentioned include:

Henry Jenkins: If it Doesn’t Spread, it’s Dead
Christy Dena: Spiral Worlds: Writing & Experience Design
Tommy Pallotta: Story & Code: Shifting Perspectives of Storytelling in Culture
Alison Norrington: Top-Down/Bottom-Up -Where is the Value?
Robert Pratten: Brand Integrated Storyworlds

Creating a Transmedia Narrative II: Storytelling — from ChristineWeitbrecht.com

Excerpt:

My last post on ‘Creating a Transmedia Narrative‘ ignited a lengthy discussion in one of my LinkedIn groups. It seems that some of my readers thought that I was trying to establish that transmedia narratives follow different narrative norms/ no longer need to be based on traditional conventions of telling a story. This is not what I was trying to say. I merely pointed at parallels found in successful story worlds, narrative universes that withstood the test of time and continue to invite producers and audiences to expand their stories across different media. In order to last for decades or more and be expandable across different media, any narrative needs to have a ‘larger-than-life’ aspect to it, and I used my blog post to break this ‘larger-than-life’ aspect down into its individual, more accessible parts.

Also see:

Digital book developers discuss the changing tide of storytelling — from padgadget.com

Addendum on 11/2/11:

Tagged with:  

Pier Luigi Capucci -- The Internet of Things

Excerpt:

We were asked to consider the Internet of Things (IoT) from the user’s viewpoint. Well, my viewpoint is exactly this, since I’m neither a company director nor a software coder or a hardware creator. From an user’s viewpoint I think we are undergoing a big transformation. The Internet of Things comes out from an evolution process which involves calculation power, connections, networking, personal technologies, and that can be resumed in four phases.

 

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