Updated Robotics Roadmap presented to US congress — from robohub.org by Frank Tobe

Excerpt:

Henrik Christensen, the KUKA Chair of Robotics at GA Tech and Chairman of the Roadmap project, Rodney Brooks, CEO of Rethink Robotics, Pete Wurman, CTO of Kiva Systems, and Russ Angold, CTO of Ekso Bionics all presented the new Roadmap to a packed gallery of the Robotics Caucus of the US Congress

The Roadmap and presentation covered six areas of robotics:
  1. Manufacturing
  2. Medical Robots
  3. Healthcare
  4. Service
  5. Space
  6. Defense

 

The roadmap is here:

RoadMapForRobotics-March2013

 

 

The Next Wave of Business and Finance Students Will Be “Renaissance Technologists” — from edtechmagazine.com by Karen Nitkin
Data-driven environments require business students to be trained on the latest technology.

Excerpts:

  • “Now, finance is a high-tech environment, just as much as manufacturing is, and the academic world hasn’t really caught up to that yet.”
  • “The abundance of data available to industry through the Internet, social networks, sensor networks and financial-transaction systems will transform business decisions.”
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Visualizing the future urban world — from fastcoexist.com by Ariel Schwartz
A new app called Urban World beautifully projects how cities around the world are going to explode in growth and economic power by 2025.

 

Also see:

 

UrbanWorld-March2013

VIDEO | The Educational Landscape in 50 Years — from the evoLLLution.com by The Khan Academy

Excerpt:

In this video, Salman Khan, founder of the Khan Academy, a not-for-profit online education provider, shares his thoughts on what the educational landscape will look like in 50 years. By 2060, Khan predicts three major shifts in education: a change to the classroom model, a change to the credential model and a change in the role of the instructor.

.

KhanAcademy-EducationIn60Years-March2013

Cisco and Wharton School unveil the learning experience of the future — from newsroom.cisco.com

 

 

 

 

Also see:

Click to view larger image on Flickr

Excerpt:

PHILADELPHIA and SAN FRANCISCO – The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and Cisco [on 2/25/13] unveiled the learning experience of the future — one that blends life-size visual communication via telepresence with collaboration technologies that significantly enhance the way faculty, students and alumni interact and learn, no matter how distant they may be from physical classrooms.

Teens and Technology 2013 — from pewinternet.org by Mary Madden, Amanda Lenhart, Maeve Duggan, Sandra Cortesi, Urs Gasser

Excerpt:

“The nature of teens’ internet use has transformed dramatically — from stationary connections tied to shared desktops in the home to always-on connections that move with them throughout the day,” said Mary Madden, Senior Researcher for the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project and co-author of the report. “In many ways, teens represent the leading edge of mobile connectivity, and the patterns of their technology use often signal future changes in the adult population.”

IBM CEO predicts three ways technology will transform the future of business — from forbes.com by Jenna Goudreau

 

Virginia Rometty

Virginia Rometty

 

  1. Data analytics will revolutionize decision-making
  2. The social network will drive value
  3. Consumer segments will cede to the individual
    .

“The greatest contribution of this shift,” Rometty concluded,
“is that it will force every entity to become an authentic organization.”

Future learning environments: professional, powerful, personal — from learning technologies by Steve Wheeler, Associate Professor of Learning Technology, Plymouth University

Description:

We will explore future learning possibilities using new and emerging technologies. Smart mobile phones, social media and learning platforms are just the start of a rapid evolution in learning technology, and many new technologies are beginning to emerge. The so called ‘Web 2.0’ tools are socially rich and participatory, enabling users to create, organise and share their own content, and collaborate with others in their professional communities, but the next phase in the evolution of the Web is already here. We will explore concepts such as Web 3.0 and Web x.0, intelligent filtering and recommender systems and speculate on how these new tools might liberate learners further, personalising their learning experiences and enabling them to create powerful professional learning networks. We will discuss:

  • Personal and professional learning networks
  • User generated content
  • Web 3.0, Web x.0 and beyond
  • Smart mobiles, intelligent filtering and recommender systems
  • Issues and challenges for organisations

In Cisco’s classroom of the future, your professor is just an illusion — from fastcoexist.com by Ariel Schwartz
New telepresence software could let you take a class from anywhere and appear as if you’re in the classroom.

 

Psalm 100 (NIV)

A psalm. For giving grateful praise.

Shout for joy to the Lord, all the earth.
    Worship the Lord with gladness;
come before him with joyful songs.
Know that the Lord is God.
It is he who made us, and we are his;
we are his people, the sheep of his pasture.

Enter his gates with thanksgiving
and his courts with praise;
give thanks to him and praise his name.
For the Lord is good and his love endures forever;
his faithfulness continues through all generations.

BBC News’ “What if?” section

BBCWhatIf-Feb2013

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Consumers in 2030 — from forumforthefuture.org

Excerpt:

Consumers in 2030 asks ‘what might consumers need from Which? in 2030?’  The result of a partnership between Forum and Which?, it aims to spark debate about the changing needs of UK consumers in the 21st century among policy-makers, think-tanks, regulators, politicians, consumer brands and consumers themselves.  It shares research and projections about what life might be like for UK consumers, and gives us a window into future needs, opportunities, issues and markets by imagining five products and services we could find at home.

 

 

ConsumersIn2030-WhichRptFromJan2013

 

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Classrooms of the Future

Excerpt:

This image gallery from Fielding Nair International, a group of architects working in education, shows lots of images from new and innovative schools around the world.

 

imgur-learningspaces-2012

 
Addendum on 2/13/13, also see:

 

Vitra School Brotorp Rosan Bosch Architects

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Vitra School Brotorp Rosan Bosch Architects


From DSC:
First, what prompted the questions and reflections that are listed below?  For that, I turn to some recent items that I ran across involving the use of robotics and whether that may or may not be affecting employment:


 

The work of Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee; for example their book Race Against the Machine

Excerpt of description:

But digital innovation has also changed how the economic pie is distributed, and here the news is not good for the median worker. As technology races ahead, it can leave many people behind. Workers whose skills have been mastered by computers have less to offer the job market, and see their wages and prospects shrink. Entrepreneurial business models, new organizational structures and different institutions are needed to ensure that the average worker is not left behind by cutting-edge machines.

 

How to freak out responsibly about the rise of the robots — from theatlantic.com by Derek Thompson
It’s fun to imagine an economy where machines are smarter than humans. But we don’t need  an artificial crisis over artificial intelligence.

Excerpt:

Let’s say it upfront: Technology can replace jobs and (at least temporarily) increase income inequality. From the spinning jenny to those massive mechanical arms flying wildly around car assembly lines, technology raises productivity by helping workers accomplish more in less time (i.e.: put a power drill in a human hand) and by replacing workers altogether (i.e.: build a power-drilling bot).

What ails us today isn’t a surplus of robots, but a deficit of demand. Yes, we have a manufacturing industry undergoing a sensational, but job-killing, productivity revolution — very much like the one that took farm employment from 40 percent in 1900 to less than 5 percent today. But the other nine-tenths of the economy are basically going through an old-fashioned weak-but-steady recovery, the kind that hundreds of years of financial crises would predict.

 

America has hit “peak jobs” — from techcrunch.com by Jon Evans

Excerpt:

“The middle class is being hollowed out,” says James Altucher. “Economists are shifting their attention toward a […] crisis in the United States: the significant increase in income inequality,” reports the New York Times.

Think all those job losses over the last five years were just caused by the recession? No: “Most of the jobs will never return, and millions more are likely to vanish as well, say experts who study the labor market,” according to an AP report on how technology is killing middle-class jobs.

 

Technology and the employment challenge — from project-syndicate.org by Michael Spence

Excerpt:

MILAN – New technologies of various kinds, together with globalization, are powerfully affecting the range of employment options for individuals in advanced and developing countries alike – and at various levels of education. Technological innovations are not only reducing the number of routine jobs, but also causing changes in global supply chains and networks that result in the relocation of routine jobs – and, increasingly, non-routine jobs at multiple skill levels – in the tradable sector of many economies.

 

 

Man vs. robot — from macleans.ca by Peter Nowak

.

industrial-robots

 

 

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Secondly, some reflections (from DSC)


I wonder…

  • What types of jobs are opening up now? (example here)
  • What types of jobs will be opening up soon? How about in 3-5 years from now?
  • Should these trends affect the way we educate and prepare our kids today? 
  • Should these trends affect the way we help employees grow/reinvent themselves?

Again, for me, the answer lies at least partly in helping people consistently obtain the knowledge that they need — i.e. to help them build, grow, and maintain their own learning ecosystems — throughout their lifetimes.  We need to help people dip their feet into the appropriate streams of content that are constantly flowing by.

Perhaps that’s one of the key new purposes that K-12, higher ed, and the corporate training departments out there will play in the future as they sift through the massive amounts of information coming at us to help individuals identify:
.

  • What are the most effective tools — and methods — that people can use to connect with others?
    (Then allow folks to pick what works best for them. Current examples: blogging/RSS feeds, Twitter, social bookmarking.)
    .
  • Who are some of the folks within each particular discipline/line of work that others (who want to learn about those disciplines) should know about?
    .
  • What trends are coming down the pike and how should we be preparing ourselves — and/or our organizations — for those changes?
    .

 

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