From DSC:
In this series of periodic postings re: experimentation (see here and here), this week’s Consumers Electronics Show prompts me to think about different types of experiments, prompting such questions as:
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  • When will we see more educationally-related second screen apps?
    .
  • How might this type of setup dovetail with MOOCs provided by institutions of higher education? With MOOCs offered by the corporate world?
    .
  • What sorts of technologies will weave their way into what could be offered here?
    (The following possibilities come to my mind: Artificial Intelligence (AI), learning agents, recommendation engines, course or topic playlists, web-based learner profiles, data mining/analytics, videoconferencing, educational gaming, virtual tutoring, BYOD, and/or cloud-based computing. Other…?)
    .
  • Will Internet-enabled marketplaces and exchanges — between learners and teachers — become commonplace?
    .
  • Will technologies involved with endeavors like IBM’s Watson or with Knewton be deployed in this kind of convergent environment? If so, what sorts of doors/job opportunities/new skillsets would that open up or require?
    .

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The Living [Class] Room -- by Daniel Christian -- July 2012 -- a second device used in conjunction with a Smart/Connected TV

 

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Some relevant items on this include:

Flingo reveals Samba, a first of its kind dual interactive TV and second screen platform — from pandodaily.com byasdf

Excerpt:

This week at CES in Las Vegas (the Consumer Electronics Show), San Francisco-based Flingo will release the latest version of its platform, dubbed Samba, aimed at changing this. Samba will make four-year-old Flingo one of the first to offer a combined Interactive TV and Second Screen experience.

“We saw a surge of Smart TV and tablet adoption in 2012, but realized that a seamless TV experience across all screens was missing,” says Flingo co-founder and CEO Ashwin Navin, formerly of BitTorrent. “Samba will blur the lines between linear television and the Web.”

Flingo is unique in that it uses video, not audio to identify what content is being viewed…

Samba offers viewers the ability to actively engage with programming in real-time through their primary screen. This can take the form of polls, social conversations, recommendations, or consumption of related media. In the case of Second Screens, aka internet-connected laptops, tablets, and smartphones used simultaneously while watching TV, the company can offer an even wider array of complementary content and engagement, such as aggregated social feeds relating to live programming or an ability to watch past episodes of a live show. This can all be delivered across multiple screens, in concert.

 

Also see:

Smart TV Alliance adds Panasonic and IBM to its fold, lays bare new SDK features -- Sean Buckley

 

Also see:

 

samsung smart tv ces 2013

 

Kevin Smith/Business Insider

 

More tangentially, but still relevant:

  • McGraw-Hill to debut adaptive e-book for students — from blogs.wsj.com by Shalini Ramachandran
    Excerpt:

    The SmartBook…works like this: All readers essentially see the same textbook as they read for the first five minutes. But as a reader answers review questions placed throughout the chapter, different passages become highlighted to point the reader to where he or she should focus attention.

 

From DSC:
The other day, I mentioned how important it will be for institutions of higher education to increase the priority of experimentation. Clicking on the graphic below will give you an example of the kind of vision/experiment that I’m talking about.

(Though, more practically speaking, to operationalize this type of vision would actually require a series of much smaller experiments; I just wanted to present the overall vision of how these pieces might fit together).

 

DanielChristian--Jan2013-Experiment-with-Apples-Ecosystem

NOTE:
This 11″x17″ image is a 10MB PDF file, so it may take some time to appear.
Feel free to right-click on the graphic in order to download/save/print the file as well.

 

Also relevant is this upcoming event from educause:

 

1/8/13 addendum resulting from a Tweet from a great colleague, Mr. Travis LaFleur (@travislafleur), UX Designer at BiggsGilmore

 

 

5 ways TV will evolve in 2013 — from readwriteweb.com by John Paul Titlow

Excerpt:

If you were expecting the Internet to upend TV like it mangled the print media business, you may have noticed by now that things aren’t so simple.

The Web is very good at delivering text and static images, but when it comes to TV-quality video content, it turns out that cable providers are still much better at that. Internet TV has two serious handicaps: content and the user interface. In 2012, the status quo crept forward in both areas, albeit slowly. Next year, TV will continue its gradual evolution toward something completely different from what we grew up with.

Also see:

  • Living room tech in 2013 — from forbes.com by Tristan Louis
    While 2012 was the year of mobile, 2013 is going to be the year of the living room, with tablets, TV screens, and e-readers becoming a big part of the new battlefield.
    .
  • Turning screens into a television — from Inc. magazine by Issie Lapowsky
    Aereo, a New York City start-up, can broadcast live television to your iPad or a laptop. That is, unless a big lawsuit shuts the company down.
    .

Aereo

Courtesy Company

More Americans are watching TV shows minus the television set. Thanks to Hulu, Netflix, and other sites, there’s plenty to watch online. But there’s one thing missing, says Chet Kanojia: live television.

What if the HCI within Leap could be applied towards an entire video wall / display?

 

Also see:

 

Understanding dual screen content apps: A market overview [Costa]

 

Also see:

Adjust your set — and your expectations — says TV of Tomorrow — from streamingmedia.com
One-day connected TV and second screen conference hits New York City, bringing a look at tomorrow’s viewing.

Smart TV hack highlights risk of ‘The Internet of Everything’ — from csoonline.com by Taylor Armerding
As the use of smart connected devices expands, so do threats because while they may not look like computers, they are

Google wants to let Chrome apps interact with your TV and other devices — from thenextweb.com
Excerpt:

Google’s Chrome team appears to be looking to extend the way the browser connects with other devices, incorporating support for a new protocol that will enable Chrome apps to discover and interact with “first screen devices.”
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The future of TV content delivery is the Internet — from by Adam Poltrack

Internet connected tv

It won’t be long before cable and satellite boxes go the way of the VCR.
We have seen the future of TV content delivery, and it is the Internet.

 

Future TV disruption – Forbes says it’s worth half a trillion dollars for Internet companies — from hackfest.tv

 

$500 Billion TV Market New Battlefield For Internet Companies — from forbes.com

 

Why Valve’s new living room PC is the new face of the console business — from digitaltrends.com by Anythony John Agnello

Also see:

 

TVConnectMarch2013

 

Looks like a very interesting set of tools/technologies out at livefyre.com — a piece of which is subtitled, the “Web’s first Engagement Management System.”
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  • How might this set of technologies/functionalities affect what’s possible with MOOCs?
    .
  • Could universities and colleges use something like this to talk to their constituencies?
    .
  • As the computer, the telephone, and the television continue to converge, what educationally-related opportunities might be possible here?

 

http://www.livefyre.com/

 

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http://www.livefyre.com/

 

The Future of TV -- an infographic from Beesmart

 

From DSC:
The educational “store” part of this graphic could take several forms:

  • Online-based exchanges between buyers and sellers (teachers/professors and learners) — professors as their own brand
  • Institutional offerings/brands
  • Team-based content from newly-developed firms, organizations
  • Each of us puts up our own learning materials for others to take (for free or for a price)
  • Other

 

Living room wars — from tnl.net by Tristan Louis

Excerpt:

Control of the TV screen is seen as a major step in the next iteration of computing. The field can be divided between hardware manufacturers, content providers and end-to-end players who are looking to provide a complete solution. The net result is that while everyone is trying to get into every other player’s field, the emerging winners may not be the ones who grab most of the headlines.

Also see:

  • The four screens — from tnl.net
    Excerpt:
    The battle for digital supremacy is increasingly being waged on 4 different screens, with much of the focus in the computing industry being focus on 2 of them. When one looks at the expanding field, however, the dynamics may be radically different than expected.

 

Addendums/see:

 

 

From DSC:
What might H2O-like functionality look like on a Smart TV?

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H20 from Harvard Law

 

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From DSC:
What educationally-related apps could something like ScreenBee address?

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American Express launches the largest ever Interactive TV advertising campaign — from marketwatch.com
New branded channel will serve as “always on” brand hub

Excerpt:

NEW YORK, Nov 21, 2012 (BUSINESS WIRE) — American Express and BrightLine announced today the rollout of the largest Interactive TV campaign ever executed, including an “always-on”, unified destination point that can be accessed by multiple cable and satellite providers. The AMEX Channel will enable American Express Cardmembers and prospects to have an interactive on-demand viewing experience that matches consumers’ evolving TV viewing behaviors.

The nationwide interactive TV channel will reach more than 50 million households in the United States. Viewers can access it through various gateways including clickable overlays that will air alongside some American Express commercials, dedicated channel positions, channel guide listings, interactive banners and more. The AMEX Channel has been designed to function as an evolving resource for Cardmembers and prospects by enabling them to visually explore the American Express experience via shared member stories, games, special offers and more on the big screen. The channel will have a consistent presence and frequently update to keep the American Express community informed, entertained and connected.

 

American Express Interactive Channel is set to reach 50 million homes — from The New York Times by Sturart Elliott

Excerpt:

American Express is promoting its wares to cardholders and potential cardholders through an interactive branded channel under a new agreement with BrightLine. American Express is promoting its wares to cardholders and potential cardholders through an interactive branded channel under a new agreement with BrightLine.

American Express is taking another step toward the new world of television that is always on, making a deal with BrightLine for a yearlong campaign centered on an interactive branded channel.

.

 

From DSC:
Further exploration/experimentation such as this is excellent; this is another pulse check on the Smart/Connected TV situation — and machine-to-machine communications and the use of second screen-based apps may be relevant here as well.

 

 

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From DSC:
Eventually, this will lay a solid foundation for what I’m calling “Learning from the Living [Class] Room.”

 

Also see:

  • HEVC is game changer for multi-screen and IPTV
    Excerpt:
    There is an industry consensus that HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding), the draft compression standard, will have a dramatic impact on the industry thanks to its ability to eventually halve bit rates compared to MPEG-4 AVC (H.264), the current encoding Gold Standard that it will complement but ultimately succeed. And as with all encoding, if you create sufficient extra coding efficiency to halve bit rates then you can also choose to leave bit rates the same but double picture quality, or turn the bandwidth/quality dial to any point in between. Encoder vendors are working towards deployments of the new codec as early as next year, probably starting with multi-screen TV services and fixed line IPTV.
    .
  • Indra Sistemas SA : Connected TV: Gateway to the job market for the disabled
    Excerpt:
    Thanks to this standard, researchers of the Visual Telecommunications Application Group (G@TV), through the Indra-Adecco Foundation Chair, are developing a television platform in which people with various disabilities can access services such as distance learning and job offers. It will also enable employers and the public to obtain information about disability and the integration of the disabled into the workforce.

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