Digital learning: What kids really want — from The Journal by Chris Riedel

Excerpt:

According to [Project Tomorrow CEO Julie] Evans, the data from those surveys indicated that students:

  • Have a growing interest in social-based learning;
  • Want to connect with and develop a personal network of expert resources;
  • Are looking for tools that increase untethered learning; and
  • Want a digitally rich learning environment, unencumbered by traditional rules.

Also:

Other things students at all grade levels are looking for include access to online tutoring, the ability to take online classes, access to real-word data and databases, greater access to teachers using SMS/text messaging, education-based virtual reality and games, and increased access to digital collaboration tools.

 

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The Evolving Digital Ecosystem - from Moxie's Trends for 2012

  • The Always On Web
  • Web of Things
  • Big Data
  • Next Gen Search
  • Mobile Sharing
  • Mobile Social Activism
  • Impulse Commerce
  • Brands As Partners
  • The New Living Room  <– From DSC: This is one of those key areas that I’m trying to keep a pulse check on for re: our learning ecosystems of the future 
  • Personal Data Security

 

Also see:

 

Next on TV: Data driven programming — from wired.co.uk by Matt Locke

Excerpt:

Quiz shows such as The Million Pound Drop Live on Channel 4 use real-time data from hundreds of thousands of online players to feed interesting stats and observations to host Davina McCall. [From DSC: What if this related to an online-based learning exercise/class/module/training session?]

This is the real revolution that is about to hit TV production — data is moving off the servers and in front of the cameras. With this comes a new generation of creative talent — data storytellers for whom the spreadsheet is as important as a script when it comes to content. TV is no longer stuck behind the screen — around 60 per cent of people in the UK watch with a “second screen” (a mobile or laptop) at the same time, and a lot of them are talking online about what they’re watching. TV is now back in the crowd, and if you make, commission or distribute content right now, you’d better learn to love data, and fast.

Also see:

  • What comes after Siri? A web that talks back — from gigaom.com by Stacey Higginbotham
    Siri may be the hottest personal assistant since I Dream of Jeannie, but Apple’s artificial intelligence is only the tip of the iceberg as we combine ubiquitous connectivity, sensor networks, big data and new methods of AI and programming into a truly connected network.
  • Ball State University Center for Media Design to Host Workshop Session — from thetvoftomorrowshow.com
    Entitled “Researching the Second Screen and Social Viewing: Two Recent Studies,” the workshop will see CMD researchers summarizing the findings from: 1) an eye-tracking study of viewers’ distribution of visual attention between the TV and second screen during use of two commercially released second-screen apps; and 2) a study of show-specific Twitter traffic rates during programming and ad pods for multiple episodes of three shows from different genres.

Cisco Connected World Technology Report

Mary Meeker 10-18-11 presentation re: Internet Trends

 

 

 In this funny, eye-opening, and inspiring film,
director Tiffany Shlain takes audiences on an
exhilarating rollercoaster ride to discover what it
means to be connected in the 21st century.

 

From DSC:
My thanks to Mr. Joseph Byerwalter for this resource.

 

 

Amazon.com -- Connecting readers and writers

How data and analytics can improve education –from O’Reilly by by Audrey Watters
George Siemens on the applications and challenges of education data.

Excerpt:

Schools have long amassed data: tracking grades, attendance, textbook purchases, test scores, cafeteria meals, and the like. But little has actually been done with this information — whether due to privacy issues or technical capacities — to enhance students’ learning.

With the adoption of technology in more schools and with a push for more open government data, there are clearly a lot of opportunities for better data gathering and analysis in education. But what will that look like? It’s a politically charged question, no doubt, as some states are turning to things like standardized test score data in order to gauge teacher effectiveness and, in turn, retention and promotion.

I asked education theorist George Siemens, from the Technology Enhanced Knowledge Research Institute at Athabasca University, about the possibilities and challenges for data, teaching, and learning.

Our interview follows.

From DSC:
My thanks to Stephen Downes for his posting on this:

Digital Living Network Alliance certifies more than 1,000 television models in first quarter of 2011
Rapid acceleration in certifications demonstrates continued importance of television as centerpiece in digital home

Excerpt:

PORTLAND, OR – July 19, 2011 – The Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) experienced unprecedented growth in the number of DLNA Certified® televisions during the first quarter of 2011, certifying more than 1,000 models in North America, Europe, Korea and Japan. The number of television models Certified by the Alliance in the first three months of the year was greater than the total number Certified in the first four years of the program. There are now more than 4,000 Certified television models available, providing consumers with a convenient way to connect and enjoy content throughout the digital home.

Total shipments of connected televisions in 2015 are expected to reach 138 million worldwide, according to DisplaySearch, a global market research and consulting firm specializing in the flat panel display supply chain and display-related industries. As the number of connected televisions grows on a global scale, and the television remains the hub of today’s digital home, DLNA is making the sharing of content across consumers’ home networks easier via standards-based products.

A New Business Model for News : Community — from TrendBird.biz

Excerpt (emphasis DSC):

We are social beings. Three-quarters of all American adults belong to voluntary or organized groups, according to “The Social Side of the Internet,” a study published this year by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. In fact, today’s social media culture may be reversing the decline in social behavior that Robert D. Putnam documented in his book “Bowling Alone.” While 56 percent of non-Internet users belong to a group, 80 percent of Internet users participate in groups, according to the study.

But if there is a common thread that weaves through Foursquare, Facebook, Zynga, Twitter, BlogHer and many other pioneers in the social economy, it is this: Creating community engenders value for people. And providing value is the heart of any successful business model.

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