AppsForHighSchool-Apple-May2013

 

From DSC:
With thanks going out to Mr. Mike Amante (@mamante) for posting this item out on Twitter.

ScienceCafes-Feb2013

 

Also see:

  • Science cafes offer a sip of learning — from reuters.com by Barbara Liston — with thanks to Annie Murphy Paul (@anniemurphypaul) who used twitter to ask: Americans resist studying science in school, but they flock to “science cafes” on their own time. What gives?
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    Excerpt:
    (Reuters) – Americans may be turning away from the hard sciences at universities, but they are increasingly showing up at “science cafes” in local bars and restaurants to listen to scientific talks over a drink or a meal.

 

Desktop CNC Machine lets you build stuff out of more than just plastic — from GIZMODO

Excerpt:

Affordable 3D printers are all the rage, but you’re limited to only creating objects from plastic or other extrudable materials. A CNC machine, however, like this ultra-compact ShopBot Desktop, can carve objects out of any material, letting you create more than just trinkets or models.

Printing a medical revolution — from trowprice.com by Russ Banham
3D printing is shaping the future of medicine
 
Addendum on 6/18/12:
 

This Gigantor CNC Machine is Longer Than a Football Field— from gizmodo.com

 
 

 
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Pocket Brain app for iOS probes layers of the human brain in 3D

Excerpt:

After exploring the body and the heart, developer eMedia has released a Pocket Brain app for iOS devices that provides a detailed look at eight layers of the brain, including cross sections, nerve pathways, and a load of supplementary learning material. eMedia calls the app a “fully searchable interactive 3D atlas” with structures that are pinned with identifications and additional clinical and anatomical information, and users are able to add their own notes on the brain within the app.

9 new life-saving technologies for doctors — from PCMag.com by Chandra Steele
These apps for physicians cure some of the ills facing the tech-deficient medical field.

Example:
Philips Vital Signs Camera

Philips Vital Signs Camera

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Healthcare-related innovations

Tiny, implantable medical device can propel itself through bloodstream — from Stanford University by Andrew Myers
Tiny, implantable medical device can propel itself through bloodstream

Excerpt:

For fifty years, scientists had searched for the secret to making tiny implantable devices that could travel through the bloodstream. Engineers at Stanford have demonstrated a wirelessly powered device that just may make the dream a reality.

 

Tiny, implantable medical device can propel itself through bloodstream

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Controlling Protein Function With Nanotechnology — from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

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CIMIT — example posting:  

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Sensable sustomers showcase touch-enabled surgical, medical simulation and robotics innovations at MMVR Conference

 

Addendums on 7/24/12:

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Interactive streaming video technology from Stanford - Summer 2011

Stanford researchers designed software that allows a viewer to zoom and pan while streaming online courses. They recently released the code to the public.

The 15 best electron microscope images of 2011 — from dvice.com by Evan Ackerman

 

 

From DSC:
God does amazing work, doesn’t He? Glory to God in the highest! I love how these images show God’s creative and detail-oriented, attributes.

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20 most impressive science fair projects of all time — from onlineuniversities.com
 

Frog Disection app from Punflay

Per Nicola Santiago at Punflay:

  • We develop educational iPhone/iPad apps for kids. Our Frog Dissection app which is being used in many schools was awarded the Mark Twain’s Ethical Science award by PETA and was also selected as the Best Science app by IEAR. We also have a Rat Dissection app in the store.

Side reflection from DSC:

This type of work shows the power of using teams of specialists. One person can’t do it all anymore — we need to face up to this fact and stop thinking that simply providing more professional development is the answer. I realize that using textbooks brings in teams of specialists — but it seems to me that we still think that simply by providing more professional development, our teachers and professors will be able to meet the constantly (and quickly) rising bar. That type of approach has outlived its usefulness and it just won’t cut it anymore; we do our students a major disservice by clinging to that outdated, status-quo-based model.

How can we move to using more teams of specialists to create and deliver our educational materials?

Nice work to the teams at Punflay in India!


 

 

 

WHO declares cellphones “possibly carcinogenic” — ars technica by John Timmer

Excerpt:

Those who are worried about the possible health risks of cellphones just received some backing from a significant source: the World Health Organization. A group within the organization, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, has announced it is listing the electromagnetic radiation produced by cell phones as “possibly carcinogenic.” The IARC’s use of the term “possibly” is key to the decision, as its expert panel determined that the information available is too limited to say anything with a greater degree of certainty, but is sufficient to warrant careful monitoring.

The designation is the result of a meeting held last week that brought 31 health researchers together to evaluate the conclusions that can be drawn from current research, including unpublished information from the Interphone study. The conclusions will eventually appear in The Lancet Oncology, but the IARC has issued a press release ahead of publication.

As we recently discussed, the wavelengths used for cellular communications are only known to influence human tissue via heating, and the researchers involved with the designation do not propose anything new here. The panel also recognizes that most of the epidemiological research involving human exposure to radio frequencies is ambiguous; for all but two types of cancer, the current state of information is officially deemed “inadequate.”

From DSC:
Though the evidence doesn’t seem to be very threatening, I’d rather be safe than sorry here. For me, a practical application that I take from this is to not use the cell phone if I can use a land line close by.

 

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Mobile app helps doctors diagnose strokes — from cnn.com by Mark Milian

Ross Mitchell, left and Mayank Goyal display the ResolutionMD Mobile iPad app, which could help doctors diagnose strokes.

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AnatOnMe projects patients’ insides onto their outsides — from gizmag.com by Paul Ridden

Excerpt:

A team at Microsoft’s research wing has developed a working prototype of a system that may help to encourage physical injury sufferers to do their exercises by giving them a clearer understanding of what’s going on. A therapist would use the device to project a series of graphics of underlying bone, muscle tissue, tendons or nerves directly onto the body of a patient to help explain the nature of the injury and prescribe effective treatment. The device can also take photos during a consultation, which can be subsequently reviewed or printed out as a memory aid for the patient.

 

 

 

 

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