Exemplary week paves the way for higher education online — from edcetera.rafter.com by Kirsten Winkler

Excerpt:

This week was quite telling for the changes the higher education sector is currently going through. And the direction the industry is heading towards seems obvious: online. This week, up-and-coming education startups raised money and introduced new products whereas leaders in the space had to announce cuts.

From DSC:
This reminds me of how University of Massachusetts President Emeritus Jack Wilson described online learning at last week’s Sloan-C Conference:

“Online learning is a relentless force that will not be denied. The trends are so relentless in fact, that they take students, faculty, and administrations along with them.”

 

IBM’s Watson expands commercial applications, aims to go mobile  — from singularityhub.com by Jason Dorrier

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From DSC:
This relates to what I was trying to get at with the posting on mobile learning.  I would add the word “Education” to the list of industries that the technologies encapsulated in Watson will impact in the future. Combine this with the convergence that’s enabling/building the Learning from the Living [Class] Room environment, and you have one heck of an individualized, data-driven, learning ecosystem that’s available 24 x 7 x 365 — throughout your lifetime!!!

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IBM Watson-Introduction and Future Applications

 

 


Also relevant here are some visions/graphics I created from 2012 and from 2008:


 

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The Living [Class] Room -- by Daniel Christian -- July 2012 -- a second device used in conjunction with a Smart/Connected TV

 

 

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Why couldn't these channels represent online-based courses/MOOCs? Daniel Christian - 10-17-12

 

 

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Big Data in K-12: Attack of the Recommendation Engines – Part I – from EdNetInsight.com by Nelson B. Heller, President, The HellerResults Group — Friday, October 12, 2012

Excerpt:

Big Data Meets Education
A wave of K-12 entrepreneurial initiatives sees the application of “big data” as the key to instructional technology’s Holy Grail—intelligent real-time differentiated instruction akin to working one-on-one with a brilliant personal instructor. Investors, aware of the powerful strides made in recommendation engines by Internet giants Google, Amazon, LinkedIn, Netflix, and Zynga, as well as for a host of military and commercial applications, see in big data education’s “next big thing.” In this and my next article, I’m going to explore what’s happening in this arena and in voice recognition technology, which, if you look under the hood, can be thought of as being driven by the same advances in data science and recommendation engines. These articles are based in part on my recent View From the Catbird Seat presentation at EdNET 2012. Read on to see what threats and opportunities this new frontier represents for your own organization.

Tagged with:  

http://edfuture.net/

 

 

Excerpt:

In countries around the world, the transition to knowledge and service economies occurring rapidly. Competitive countries are no longer only those that have an abundance of natural resources, but also those with a highly educated populace. Higher education is increasingly recognized as a vehicle for economic development [1].

University leaders are struggling to make sense of how internationalization, the current economic conditions, and new technologies will impact their systems. Educators are uncertain of the impact of open educational resources, alternative accreditation models, de-professionalization of academic positions, and increased grant competitiveness. What is role of the academy in increasing national economic competitiveness while preserving the “vital combat for lucidity” [2] that defines an open democratic society?

 

Apple TV and the transformation of web apps into tablet and TV dual screen apps — from brightcove.com by Jeremy Allaire

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Excerpts:

Importantly, designers and developers need to shed the concept that “TVs” are for rendering video, and instead think about “TVs” as large monitors on which they can render applications, content and interactivity that is supported by a touch-based tablet application.

The key concept here is that this pervasive adoption of TV monitors is the tip of the spear in creating a social computing surface in the real world.

Specifically, Apple has provided the backbone for dual screen apps, enabling:

  • Any iOS device (and OSX Mountain Lion-enabled PCs) to broadcast its screen onto a TV. Think of this as essentially a wireless HDMI output to a TV. If you haven’t played with AirPlay mirroring features in iOS and Apple TV, give it a spin, it’s a really exciting development.
  • A set of APIs and an event model for enabling applications to become “dual screen aware” (e.g. to know when a device has a TV screen it can connect to, and to handle rendering information, data and content onto both the touch screen and the TV screen).


[Jeremy listed several applications for these concepts:  Buying a house, buying a car, doctor’s office, kids edutainment, the classroom, retail electronics store, consuming news, consuming video, sales reporting, board games.]

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Also see:

 
From DSC:
Graphically speaking — and approaching this from an educational/learning ecosystems standpoint — I call this, “Learning from the Living [Class] Room.

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The Living [Class] Room -- by Daniel Christian -- July 2012 -- a second device used in conjunction with a Smart/Connected TV

 

 

 

Learning from the living room -- a component of our future learning ecosystems -- by Daniel S. Christian, June 2012

 

 

Related item:

10 homeschooling trends you should know about — from edudemic.com by Kati Lepi

Excerpt:

Homeschooling has been around for most of recorded history, but hybrid homeschooling is a fairly new phenomenon. For hybrid homeschoolers, education takes on multiple dimensions, combining elements of both homeschooling and traditional schooling to take advantage of the best aspects of both.

That means many hybrid homeschooling families study at home, with tutors, take classes with certified teachers, and even pursue outside educational activities to complete their curriculum. It’s a fun and enriching approach to education that is picking up steam, and we’ve noted several telling trends that say a lot about where hybrid homeschooling is today, and where it’s going.

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25 trends disrupting education right now — from teachthought.com by Terry Heick

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Why online education has gained revolutionary momentum — from pbs.org/mediashift by Doug Ward

Excerpt:

The rush to create large, free online classes has generated anxiety at universities around the country. With finances already tight and with a surge of movement toward online learning, universities are being forced to move quickly to change centuries-old models of learning. Terms like historic, seismic and revolutionary now pop up in descriptions of the challenges that higher education faces in the coming years.

Many institutions have been preparing for these changes for years, building infrastructure and expertise, experimenting and recruiting, and integrating online learning into long-term strategies. Many others, especially traditional research universities, have been caught flat-footed as education has transformed around them.

This point of dramatic — and traumatic — change didn’t swoop in unannounced. Rather, it crept in like a series of streams meeting in a roiling confluence. Only by stepping back and looking in panoramic fashion can we truly understand how we’ve arrived at a point of transformation and how we might deal with it. Let’s take a look.


Book Description:
The forces transforming tomorrow are profound, powerful, and accelerating. The Internet, social networks, crowd-sourcing, gaming dynamics, new information and communication technologies, robotics, biotechnology, and nanotechnology are all converging to transform everything from agriculture, energy, education, and law enforcement to health care, manufacturing, retail, and transportation.

In Foresight 20/20, professional futurists and business forecasters Jack Uldrich and Simon Anderson have developed eleven scenarios designed to aid the reader in understanding how a variety of technological trends are transforming the world of tomorrow. The trends are exciting and scary, positive and negative, prosaic and profound, and will impact both one’s personal and professional life. As Cervantes said centuries ago, ”Forewarned, forearmed; to be prepared is half the victory.” Foresight 20/20 goes one step further and not only prepares the reader for victory but also instills the confidence necessary to create tomorrow’s victories.

 

Also relevant/see:

 

 

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NBC News app coming to Xbox 360 games console — from worldtvpc.com

Excerpt:

NBC News is coming to your Xbox 360, and in the process could be showing us a glimpse of television for the Xbox in the future. Comcast and Microsoft are strengthening their partnership to bring an NBC News App to the perennial gaming console. More than 26 million people are using Xbox 360s with an Xbox Live Gold Account, a majority of which are not playing video games, but rather using the device to stream content.

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Survey paints positive outlook for connected TV platforms — from blog.brightcove.com

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 New iOS app Renewed provides personal television guide and more — from World Internet TV on PC by skyler

Excerpt:

A new app has arrived for iOS devices called Renewed, and anyone who is seeking a personalized television guide and find out if their favorite shows are going to be renewed, will want to download this free app immediately. The app, which notifies you of upcoming shows will also provide viewers with up to date information on renewals and cancellations–even pre-emption!

 

What’s on TV? Online videos of course! — from gigamom by Om Malik

 

Consumers increasingly viewing online content on TVs — from pcmag.com by Stephanie Mlot

 

Sony files patent to make TV ads into video games — from fastcodesign.com

 

Your friends are your next TV Guide — from fastcompany.com

 

Adobe Systems set to enhance “Everywhere TV” platforms — from worldtvpc.com

 


From DSC:
The above types of items lay the foundation for:


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The Living [Class] Room -- by Daniel Christian -- July 2012 -- a second device used in conjunction with a Smart/Connected TV

 

 

 

 

 


Addendum:

 

The middle class falls further behind -- part of the perfect storm for higher ed in the US

 

From DSC:
Along with a host of other trends, this is a piece of the perfect storm in higher ed. People will find a way to make a living — whether this involves “traditional” higher education or not. From a career development side of things, robotics may make these graphics even more pronounced as jobs move from being done by humans to jobs being done by robots.

Also see:

 

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Addendums:

 

Your future TV is not about Tele-Vision [Eaton]

Your future TV is not about Tele-Vision — from FastCompany.com by Kit Eaton

Excerpt (emphasis below from DSC; also see the above categories to see how I see this as a highly-relevant component to our future learning ecosystems):

Then imagine what a hybrid of Apple’s tech and efforts like GetGlue, Shazam, and other interactive systems will be like when they’re more integrated into your 2017 smart TV. The big screen in your living room won’t be a one-way window into another world you can’t touch anymore. It’ll be a discovery engine, a way to learn facts, interact with the world, talk to people, find new and surprising content to absorb. Advertisers will love it, and companies like Nielsen–which largely has to guess all those stats about who watches which show at primetime nowadays–will be able to get accurate data…which may mean more appealing shows.

 

 

The Living [Class] Room -- by Daniel Christian -- July 2012 -- a second device used in conjunction with a Smart/Connected TV

 

 

Also see:

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