LWF World Summit – The Barbican – June 17th-21st, 2013

 

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Other resources/links

This is Learning Without Frontiers
Learning Without Frontiers (LWF) is a global platform that facilitates the ongoing dialogue about the future of learning. LWF attracts an engaged and open-minded audience who are forward thinking, curious and receptive to new ideas and perspectives about education, teaching and learning.  They are an international audience of thought leaders, policy makers, innovators, entrepreneurs and leading practitioners from across the education, digital media and technology sectors.  They are education leaders, intellectuals, social and political theorists, artists, designers, futurists, architects, publishers, broadcasters, technologists, parents, teachers and learners.  They come to ask the big questions, discuss the big challenges and seek to answer them by innovation, enterprise and an enduring optimism. http://www.learningwithoutfrontiers.com

 


 

Prison reform through inmate education — from NBC News’ Education Nation by Melissa Harris-Perry and Sean Pica
Sean Pica, executive director of Hudson Link for Higher Education in Prison, talks about how his organization provides educational services to men and women in four New York state correctional facilities.

From DSC:
One particular item that Melissa mentioned that jumped out at me:

  • National rate of recidivism (i.e. relapse into criminal behavior) = 40%
  • Recidivism rate of those 260 in prison who have gone through the Hudson Link for Higher Education in Prison = 0%

 

 

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Along these lines of innovation/experimentation (but this time within higher education):

Timeline on the history of education -- by Brian Tate

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Excerpt:

Forecast 3.0, Recombinant Education: Regenerating the Learning Ecosystem, highlights five disruptions that will reshape learning over the next decade.  New education innovations, organizations, resources, and relationships will proliferate, giving us all the opportunity to put the pieces – some long-established and some new – together in new sequences to create a diverse and evolving learning ecosystem.  Education recombination promises to bolster the learning ecosystem’s resilience by helping it withstand threats and make use of possibilities.

 

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From DSC:
I originally saw this at GettingSmart.com — my thanks to the Getting Smart Staff for carrying a blog posting on this one — they nicely summarize the 5 disruptive forces therein:

  • Democratized Startups: Transformational investment strategies and open access to startup knowledge, expertise, and networks will seed an explosion of disruptive social innovations.
  • High-Fidelity Living: As big data floods human sensemaking capacities, cognitive assistants and contextual feedback systems will help people target precisely their interactions with the world.
  • De-Institutionalized Production: Activity of all sorts will be increasingly independent of institutions as contributions become more ad-hoc, dynamic, and networked.
  • Customizable Value Webs: Innovative, open business models will leverage complex networks of assets and relationships to create ultra-customer-centric experiences across industries.
  • Sharable Cities: Next gen cities will drive social innovation, with urban infrastructure shaped by patterns of human connection and contribution.


 

The future of education, according to McGraw-Hill — from edcetera.com by Kirsten Winkler

Excerpt:

Certainly, there needed to be a set of skills defined to call a student college-ready, but the path of how to achieve these fixed goals should be an individual one that allows students to go after their interests and respects their individual talents. Students shouldn’t be in the same grade when they’re not on the same level. What we’re talking about is a flexible system that would depend on when a student is ready rather than when a curriculum defines they’re ready.

Such a more flexible model is inspired by some of the things that are happening in higher education already. This is a great example of how innovation taken from higher ed is making its way into high schools.

Vinet Madan used a nice metaphor when he explained this approach in our interview. It’s like the decision to take either the scenic route by the coast or the highway to get to your goal. Ultimately, both routes will take you to the destination, it’s just a personal preference.

Also see:

Why education is the right direction for tech entrepreneurs -- by Harrison Kratz -- 9-26-12

25 trends disrupting education right now — from teachthought.com by Terry Heick

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Why school?: How education must change when learning and information are everywhere [Kindle edition]
Publication date: September 10, 2012

Will Richardson: Why School?

Book description

Traditional educators, classrooms, and brick-and-mortar schools are no longer necessary to access information. Instead, things like blogs and wikis, as well as remote collaborations and an emphasis on ‘critical thinking’ skills are the coins of the realm in this new kingdom. Yet the national dialogue on education reform focuses on using technology to update the traditional education model, failing to reassess the fundamental design on which it is built.

In ‘Why School?,’ educator, author, parent and blogger Will Richardson challenges traditional thinking about education — questioning whether it still holds value in its current form. How can schools adjust to this new age? Or students? Or parents? In this provocative read, Richardson provides an in-depth look at how connected educators are beginning to change their classroom practice. Ultimately, ‘Why School?’ serves as a starting point for the important conversations around real school reforms that must ensue, offering a bold plan for rethinking how we teach our kids, and the consequences if we don’t.

Also see Will’s blog posting re: this new book –> Why School?

Excerpt:

I’m excited because it’s an opportunity, I hope, to spread a different conversation around what schools can be and, I think, need to be at this moment when our access to information and teachers and a whole bunch of other stuff is exploding. I sincerely believe that over the next couple of decades, what happens in schools is going to fundamentally change, and that there are basically two competing narratives around what that change looks like. Right now, the not so wonderful narrative is taking hold. I’m humbly hoping that Why School? can in some way serve as a support for the other more student-centered narrative to take hold.

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[video_lightbox_vimeo5 video_id=46294572 width=800 height=600 anchor=”http://danielschristian.com/learning-ecosystems/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/ExploringDisruptions-Mark-Elgart-August2012.jpg”]

(Click on above image to see the video)

Also see:
http://www.advanc-ed.org/

http://designthinkingforeducators.com/

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The Complete Parent’s List of Education Hashtags on Twitter — from onlinecollege.org
Excerpt:

As a parent, it’s important to be a part of the discussion about education. Informed parents can make a difference, not just in the lives of their own children, but in schools, policy, and more. You can stay in the loop and contribute your opinion by taking part in these chats and using these hashtags. Check out our list, and you’ll find more than 30 of the most relevant and useful hashtags for parents interested in education today.

10 College Business Incubators We’re Most Excited About — from bestcollegesonline.com
Excerpt:

College campuses are ripe with innovation, as students grow through education and experimentation in school. To help foster this innovation, many colleges and universities have opened business incubators, helping students and others in their community to help make their innovative dreams a reality. Whether they’re offering tricked-out labs or incredible funding opportunities, these incubators offer a great opportunity for students who are smart (and lucky!) enough to participate. Follow along as we explore 10 of the most exciting college business incubators around today, and be sure to share your own favorites in the comments.

The 10 Biggest Breakthroughs in the Science of Learning — from Online PHD Programs
Excerpt:

When it comes to human organs, none is quite so mysterious as the brain. For centuries, humans have had numerous misconceptions and misunderstandings about how the organ works, grows, and shapes our ability to learn and develop. While we still have a long way to go before we truly unravel all the mysteries the brain has to offer, scientists have been making some major breakthroughs that have gone a long way in explaining both how the brain functions and how we use it to organize, recall, and acquire new information. Here, we list just a few of the biggest and most impactful of these breakthroughs that have contributed to our understanding of the science of learning.

10 BYOD Classroom Experiments (and What We’ve Learned From Them So Far)” — from onlineuniversities.com
Excerpt:

With budgets tight, many schools are hoping to bring technology into the classroom without having to shell out for a device for each student. A solution for many has been to make classes BYOD (short for “bring your own device”), which allows students to bring laptops, tablets, and smartphones from home and to use them in the classroom and share them with other students. It’s a promising idea, especially for schools that don’t have big tech budgets, but it has met with some criticism from those who don’t think that it’s a viable long-term or truly budget-conscious decision. Whether that’s the case is yet to be seen, but these stories of schools that have tried out BYOD programs seem to be largely positive, allowing educators and students to embrace technology in learning regardless of the limited resources they may have at hand.

The 25 Best Resources For Finding Nonprofit Jobs — from bachelorsdegreeonline.com
Excerpt:

Finding a job that helps you make ends meet is great, but finding one that helps you make a real, lasting difference in the world can be even better, especially for those who have always dreamed of a career in the nonprofit or social services sectors. Luckily, there are a number of incredibly useful sites on the web that can help you network, share your resume, and find nonprofit job openings in your area. We’ve shared 25 of them here so you can get your nonprofit job search started on the right foot and hopefully find a job that lets you make a positive impact on the world and your community.

8 Career Mistakes New Grads Make (and How to Avoid Them) — from onlinedegreeprograms.com
Excerpt:

You’ve crossed the stage, thrown your hat in the air, and entered the real world. You’re probably eager to get your career started and are already thinking ahead 10 years when you’ll be running a company, saving the world, and making wads of cash. But slow down there, new grad. Your career starts with baby steps and avoiding some of the common mistakes young workers make. If you follow these tips and stay away from some pitfalls, you’ll be in that corner office in no time.

15 Libraries Taking Summer Reading to the Next Level — from the Online Education Database
Excerpt:

While not an exhaustive list (there are a lot of amazing libraries out there), here we highlight some of the libraries we think are going above and beyond in their summer reading initiatives, offering programs and activities that help readers spend their summers reading, learning, sharing, and growing.

8 Predictions for the Future of Academic Publishing — from the Online Education Database
Excerpt:

University presses and academic journals may perpetuate the world’s most groundbreaking research, but they tend towards the heavily conservative when it comes to changing anything and everything about their organization. But the inevitable influx of digital and new media ventures has already started trickling into the tightknit institutions, and many scholars are already calling for a dismantling of the old — and often unwieldy and inaccessible! Some of the latest experiments will stick, while others will go all Crystal Pepsi on humanity. Until time decides to tell, the following represent a few things academics are saying about where their research might be headed.

Top 25 Education Blogs for Proactive Parents — from onlinecollege.org
Excerpt:

As a parent, it’s your job to look ahead and plan for the future, whether that means packing lunch or creating a roadmap for college. Perhaps one of the most important things parents can look ahead to is education. School reform, college, and getting involved as a parent are all important topics for parents to stay on top of, and these blogs all offer great ways to do so. We’ve discovered 25 of the best education blogs for proactive parents, and we encourage you to check them out.


How can you know if it’s *really* “research-based?” — from Daniel Willingham

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Excerpt:

My new book, When Can You Trust the Experts: How to Tell Good Science from Bad in Education is now available. (There’s a link for a free download of Chapter 1 on this page.)

I wrote the book out of frustration with a particular problem: the word “research” has become meaningless in education. Every product is claimed to be research-based. But we all know that can’t be the case. How are teachers and administrators supposed to know which claims are valid?

The second half of the book describes the short cut, which consists of four steps:

  1. Strip it. Clear away the verbiage and look at the actual claim. What exactly is the claim suggesting a teacher or parent should do, and what outcome is promised?
  2. Trace it. Who created this idea, and what have others said about it? It’s common to believe something because an authority confirms it, and this is often a reasonable thing to do. I think people rely heavily on credentials when evaluating education research, but I argue that it’s a weak indicator of truth.
  3. Analyze it. Why are you being asked to believe the claim is true? What evidence is offered, and how does the claim square with your own experience?
  4. Should I do it? You’re not going to adopt every educational program that is scientifically backed, and it may make sense to adopt one that has not been scientifically evaluated.
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Envisioning the future of education — from envisioningtech.com by Michell Zappa

Excerpt:

Models of teaching worldwide are being revolutionized and reconsidered in real-time, and it seems everybody is looking for the holy grail of how to future-proof their classrooms. Advancing technology is leaving old schools of thought in their wake, and teachers are waking up to the fact that things will only speed up further in the foreseeable future.

Having spent time with the wonderful people at TFE Research in Dublin earlier this year, our new visualization is a concise overview of technologies that have the potential to disrupt and improve teaching on all levels.

Along with a few dozen emerging techs, we identified six key trends that link and contextualize said technologies, including classroom digitization, gamification and disintermediation.

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Envisioning the future of educational technology

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