Living room wars — from tnl.net by Tristan Louis

Excerpt:

Control of the TV screen is seen as a major step in the next iteration of computing. The field can be divided between hardware manufacturers, content providers and end-to-end players who are looking to provide a complete solution. The net result is that while everyone is trying to get into every other player’s field, the emerging winners may not be the ones who grab most of the headlines.

Also see:

  • The four screens — from tnl.net
    Excerpt:
    The battle for digital supremacy is increasingly being waged on 4 different screens, with much of the focus in the computing industry being focus on 2 of them. When one looks at the expanding field, however, the dynamics may be radically different than expected.

 

Addendums/see:

 

 

From DSC:
What might H2O-like functionality look like on a Smart TV?

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H20 from Harvard Law

 

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From DSC:
What educationally-related apps could something like ScreenBee address?

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China looks to lead the Internet of Things — from cnn.com by Kevin Voigt.

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The $5,000 Cybertecture Mirror monitors health statistics and real-time social media updates.

The $5,000 Cybertecture Mirror monitors health statistics and real-time social media updates.
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • The Internet of Things market in China is expected to hit $80.3 billion in 2015
  • Beijing has earmarked $800 million for IoT investment by 2015
  • China has created state-funded zones like Chengdu Internet of Things Technology Institute
  • Beijing aims to become a global leader in setting IoT global standards

 

 

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From DSC, some examples:

  • Unbundling and Unmooring: Technology and the Higher Ed Tsunami — from educause.org by Audrey Watters
  • Unbundling Higher Education | From the Bell Tower –– from lj.libraryjournal.com by Steven Bell
    Excerpt (emphasis DSC):
    Recent events in higher education suggest a new trend — earning degrees by the course from multiple providers. Are we looking at the iTunes model of unbundled higher ed? Call it alt-HE.
  • Napster, Udacity, and the Academy — from Clay Shirky
    Excerpt:
    Once you see this pattern—a new story rearranging people’s sense of the possible, with the incumbents the last to know—you see it everywhere. First, the people running the old system don’t notice the change. When they do, they assume it’s minor. Then that it’s a niche. Then a fad. And by the time they understand that the world has actually changed, they’ve squandered most of the time they had to adapt.
    .
    It’s been interesting watching this unfold in music, books, newspapers, TV, but nothing has ever been as interesting to me as watching it happen in my own backyard. Higher education is now being disrupted; our MP3 is the massive open online course (or MOOC), and our Napster is Udacity, the education startup.

    But who faces that choice? Are we to imagine an 18 year old who can set aside $250K and 4 years, but who would have a hard time choosing between a residential college and a series of MOOCs? Elite high school students will not be abandoning elite colleges any time soon; the issue isn’t what education of “the very best sort” looks like, but what the whole system looks like.

American Express launches the largest ever Interactive TV advertising campaign — from marketwatch.com
New branded channel will serve as “always on” brand hub

Excerpt:

NEW YORK, Nov 21, 2012 (BUSINESS WIRE) — American Express and BrightLine announced today the rollout of the largest Interactive TV campaign ever executed, including an “always-on”, unified destination point that can be accessed by multiple cable and satellite providers. The AMEX Channel will enable American Express Cardmembers and prospects to have an interactive on-demand viewing experience that matches consumers’ evolving TV viewing behaviors.

The nationwide interactive TV channel will reach more than 50 million households in the United States. Viewers can access it through various gateways including clickable overlays that will air alongside some American Express commercials, dedicated channel positions, channel guide listings, interactive banners and more. The AMEX Channel has been designed to function as an evolving resource for Cardmembers and prospects by enabling them to visually explore the American Express experience via shared member stories, games, special offers and more on the big screen. The channel will have a consistent presence and frequently update to keep the American Express community informed, entertained and connected.

 

American Express Interactive Channel is set to reach 50 million homes — from The New York Times by Sturart Elliott

Excerpt:

American Express is promoting its wares to cardholders and potential cardholders through an interactive branded channel under a new agreement with BrightLine. American Express is promoting its wares to cardholders and potential cardholders through an interactive branded channel under a new agreement with BrightLine.

American Express is taking another step toward the new world of television that is always on, making a deal with BrightLine for a yearlong campaign centered on an interactive branded channel.

.

 

From DSC:
Further exploration/experimentation such as this is excellent; this is another pulse check on the Smart/Connected TV situation — and machine-to-machine communications and the use of second screen-based apps may be relevant here as well.

 

Virtual U. -- College of future could be come one, come all

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From DSC:
I don’t think that what we know today as “MOOCs” are anywhere’s nearly fully-baked and ready for prime time.  They will be refined, altered , and new systems/software will be further developed for them.   But the idea of reducing costs, increasing access, and experimenting sounds good to me!  As illustrated above, the idea of “Rock Star Professor” or “Super Professor” is gaining traction.   Also, note the team-based approach here.

 

 

 

Dept. of Ed. taps online learning startup Knewton for at-risk youth program — from gigaom.com by Ki Mae Heussner
The U.S. Department of Education has announced that it will partner with online learning startup Knewton and publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for a program aimed at helping millions of at-risk youth transition to traditional schools and prepare for the workforce.

Also see:

From DSC:
I understand that Mr. George Lucas is going to express his generosity in donating the $4.05 billion from the sale of Lucasfilm to education.

Here’s a question/idea that I’d like to put forth to Mr. Lucas (or to the United States Department of Education, or to another interested/committed party):

Would you consider using the $4+ billion gift to build an “Online Learning Dream Team?”

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Daniel Christian -- The Online Learning Dream Team - as of November 2012

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 Original image credit (before purchased/edited by DSC)
yobro10 / 123RF Stock Photo

 

 

From DSC:
What do you think? What other “players” — technologies, vendors, skillsets, etc. — should be on this team?

  • Perhaps videography?
  • Online tutoring?
  • Student academic services?
  • Animation?
  • Digital photography?

 

Broadband, broadcast lines erode as TV shifts to a mobile, multiscreen media landscape — from by Joseph O’Halloran back from 2/11/2012

Excerpt:

[Q2 2012] research from online video firm Ooyala has confirmed the trend that viewers around the world are embracing mobile, multiscreen experiences for both long-form and short-form content.

The Ooyala Global Video Index Report for the second quarter of 2012 reveals that online video uptake may be rising across the world but that engagement patterns vary by country and region, with a number of global video hot spots. For example, in the UK the survey revealed that 15% of the total time spent watching online video occurs on mobile phones and tablets, while 11% of the total time spent watching online video in China occurs on tablets and smart phones.

From DSC:
Though this report summarizes data from Q2 2012, it shows the developing trends on some of the ways that people are using their devices (throughout the globe).  I will continue to watch this space  for what happens with learning-based applications; especially those apps using 2 screens.
.
.
Also see:

Why Apple could still own the living room of the future — from cultofmac.com by Mike Elgan

 

Why Apple Could Still Own the Living Room of the Future

Microsoft, Nintendo, Sony, Google and all the big-screen TV makers want to
own the the all-purpose living room entertainment system of tomorrow.

 

 

Connected home has broad appeal — from connectedworldmag.com

Excerpt:

Connectivity is becoming a part of so many home devices and systems that someday soon we may no longer refer to “connected home” technology but instead simply say technology for the home. The connected aspect will be implied, thanks in part to M2M (machine-to-machine) technology.

 

 

Augmented Reality in education — from ARNews.TV by Paul Hamilton

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Augmented Reality in Education - October 26 2012

 

 

Learn best practices for using iBooks Author in education — from the New Media Consortium

Excerpt:

In 2012 the AT&T Learning Studio, NMC member Abilene Christian University (ACU) produced an annual report for corporate and on-campus audiences. The report needed to showcase media content within the broader context of our mandate to be a learning laboratory within the university. ACU chose iBooks Author to test its value as a tool for first-time users and design professionals. This webinar recording will walk you through opportunities and challenges in using iBooks Author for major projects.

 

 

Gartner Reveals Top Predictions for IT Organizations and Users for 2013 and Beyond
Analysts Examine Latest Industry Directions at Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, October 21-25 in Orlando

ORLANDO, Fla., October 24, 2012—

Gartner, Inc. has revealed its top predictions for IT organizations and IT users for 2013 and beyond. Gartner analysts presented their findings during Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, being held here through October 25.

 Gartner’s top predictions focus on economic risks, opportunities and innovations that will impel CIOs to move to the next generation of business-driven solutions. Selected from across Gartner’s research areas as the most compelling and critical predictions, they address the trends and topics that underline the reduction of control that IT has over the forces that affect it.

 “The priorities of CEOs must be dealt with by CIOs who exist in a still-turbulent economy and increasingly uncertain technology future,” said Daryl Plummer, managing vice president and Gartner fellow. “As consumerization takes hold and the Nexus of Forces drives CEOs to certain expectations, CIOs must still provide reliability, serviceability and availability of systems and services. Their priorities must span multiple areas. As the world of IT moves forward, it is finding that it must coordinate activities in a much wider scope than it once controlled, and as a result, a loss of control echoes through several predictions we are making.”

Gartner’s top predictions for IT organizations include the following…

 

Invisible’s ‘The New Obsolete’ showcases self-constructed instruments, touts a typewriter-driven piano (video) — from engadget.com by Billy Steele

Invisible's 'The New Obsolete' showcases selfconstructed instruments, touts a typewriterdriven piano

 

Addendums:

 

The future of higher education: White paper  — from IBM and the American Council on Education (ACE; specifically, the ACE Fellows Program)

Excerpts (emphasis DSC):

The role of higher education is to give students the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in a globally competitive world. Education isn’t just about teaching students to take tests well, but rather to create lifelong learners who can contribute to a thriving society and competitive economy.

From DSC:
We will have a very hard time creating lifelong learners if a large swath of people dislike learning in the first place.  When 20-30%+ of our youth are not even graduating from high school, I can’t help but recall a saying from one of my first coaches:

Always change a losing game. Never change a winning game.

I think that our biggest gift to students is not what they were able to get on an ACT or SAT test — though I realize how important that can be in getting into College ABC or University of XYZ (and thus hopefully helping them get started on a solid footing/career).  Rather, on a grander scale, our biggest gift to our students is that they would enjoy learning; that we could help students identify their God-given passion(s), talents, gifts, abilities — and then go develop them and use them to serve others. Everyone will benefit if they do so; and the students will know joy and purpose in their lives. These are the types of WIN-WIN situations that square up with the thinking of many economists —  “Do what you do best and everyone benefits.”

 

College is dead. Long live college! — from nation.time.com by Amanda Ripley

Excerpt:

From DSC:
Whether MOOCs make it or not, the key contribution (at least as of fall 2012) about them for me is that they are helping usher in much more innovative ways of thinking and are helping us to experiment more within higher education.
Also see:

IBM’s Watson expands commercial applications, aims to go mobile  — from singularityhub.com by Jason Dorrier

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From DSC:
This relates to what I was trying to get at with the posting on mobile learning.  I would add the word “Education” to the list of industries that the technologies encapsulated in Watson will impact in the future. Combine this with the convergence that’s enabling/building the Learning from the Living [Class] Room environment, and you have one heck of an individualized, data-driven, learning ecosystem that’s available 24 x 7 x 365 — throughout your lifetime!!!

.

 

IBM Watson-Introduction and Future Applications

 

 


Also relevant here are some visions/graphics I created from 2012 and from 2008:


 

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The Living [Class] Room -- by Daniel Christian -- July 2012 -- a second device used in conjunction with a Smart/Connected TV

 

 

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Why couldn't these channels represent online-based courses/MOOCs? Daniel Christian - 10-17-12

 

 

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Higher education used to be on deck, but is now at bat. [Christian]

 

From DSC:
My way of thinking about what’s happening to higher education these days borrows from the sport of baseball:  Higher education used to be on deck; but now, we’re at bat.

I’ve watched as the former power brokers throughout many other industries reluctantly got out of the dugout, nervously began their warm up on deck, and then timidly moved up to bat as well. They were trying to cling to the status quo. Which didn’t work.  We’ve all seen the results.  There are new power brokers in those industries now.  (Which is I why I assert that there is danger in the status quo — our organizations need to always be at the work of reinventing ourselves.)

If I had to pick the top 2 forces driving change throughout the higher education landscape, I would have to say the cost of obtaining a degree and technology-enabled innovation.

Control is an illusion; people will find a way.

 


The items below reinforced my perspectives when I saw them this morning.  They inspired me to create the above graphic, something I’ve been meaning to do for quite some time now.


Excerpt:

Our thesis with xEducation is that the internet is happening to higher education and that successful universities of the future will be those that find ways to generate value for its many stakeholders that go beyond content provision and teaching. What exactly that value proposition is remains unclear. On the one hand, content and (recorded) lectures can easily be shared with limited costs. The internet scales content exceptionally well. The human, social, processes of learning don’t scale. Research doesn’t scale (yet). Regional and national economic value generation doesn’t scale. In these spaces where scalability does not work well, universities will likely find their new roles in society. Over the next six months, we’ll explore and test this thesis and place the discussion of higher education reform on a firmer foundation than the latest tool and popular hype.

 

College may never be the same — from USA Today by Mary Beth Marklein

Excerpt:

“The industry has operated more or less along the same business model and even the same technology for hundreds of years,” says John Nelson, managing director of Moody’s Higher Education. “MOOCS represent a rapidly developing and emerging change and that is very, very rare.”

In a new report, Moody’s Investor Service calls MOOCs a “pivotal development” that has the potential to revolutionize higher education. Questions remain whether these online courses can be profitable and whether traditional colleges will award credit for them. But if successful, MOOCs could lead to lower costs for families and access to higher-quality instruction for anyone in the world who has Internet access.

 

From DSC:
MOOCs are no doubt a very important experiment within higher education today.  It’s too early to tell what the future will bring in terms of pricing, certification/accredidation, learning effectiveness, the form(s) they may take, the corporate world’s perspective on them, etc.

However, my main point that I want to make today — September 13, 2012 — is that MOOCs provide yet another example why the question of “where’s the ROI on all of this investment in technology?” should be considered a dead question — let’s put it to rest for good.   I simply can’t take that question seriously anymore.  At minimum, MOOCs provide an extremely affordable means of gaining exposure to information and ascertaining one’s interest level in that subject. At the price of higher education these days, such knowledge of what one enjoys and would like to learn more about is worth a great deal.  MOOCs rest on the foundations set by so many other investments, technological advancements and inventions, trends, platforms, devices, and the pedagogies available to us due to these other foundational pieces.

 

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