Welcome to the doctor's office of the future: It's a kiosk

 

Image: HealthSpot
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3d4medical.com

 

3d4medical-dot-com-apps-dec2012

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3d4medical-dot-com-images-animations-dec2012

 

The robot doctor will see you now — from tech.fortune.cnn.com by Jennifer Alsever, contributor
The RP-VITA robot promises to eliminate geographic boundaries and allow physician specialists to care for faraway patients.

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The coming revolution in health care — from inc.com by Adam Bluestein
To understand how the American health-care system is about to change, forget Washington. Look to the innovative companies hard at work on the future.

Excerpts/BIG IDEAS:

  • Medicine is a marketplace
    With new software, the doctor will see you now, not in three weeks.
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  • The consumer is king
    How to get good data into the hands of patients.
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  • The digital health record is here
    A cure for chronic paperwork.
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  • Health care is social
    Is the crowd smarter than your doctor? Just possibly.
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  • The house call makes a comeback
    A computer screen becomes an exam room.
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  • The algorithm is in
    Why smart software means better diagnoses.
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  • Your doctor is watching you
    How a simple text message can make you healthier.

 

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My thanks to Michell Zappa, Founder Envisioning Technology for this item:

 

The future of health technology -- a new visualization from Envisioning Technology

Excerpt:

Technology is the ultimate democratizing force in society. Over time, technology raises lowest common denominators by reducing costs and connecting people across the world. Medical technology is no exception to this trend: previously siloed repositories of information and expensive diagnostic methods are rapidly finding a global reach and enabling both patients and practitioners to make better use of information.

Our new visualization is an exercise in speculating about which individual technologies are likely to affect the scenario of health in the coming decades. Arranged in six broad areas, the forecast covers a multitude of research and developments that are likely to disrupt the future of healthcare.

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IBM working on Watson app for smartphones — from extremetech.com by Sebastian Anthony

Excerpt:

After conquering Jeopardy, battling patent trolls, and chasing down health insurance fraudsters, IBM now plans to bring Watson to smartphones. Watson is an artificial intelligence that is capable of answering very complex questions using natural language answers. In essence, IBM is hoping to build a better, faster, and more professional/enterprisey version of Apple’s Siri, the voice-controlled assistant that debuted on the iPhone 4S.
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IBM Watson

 

Watson, come here: A clue to cancer! — from jumpthecurve.net by Jack Uldrich

Excerpt (emphasis DSC; regarding the video there, I don’t think we can so easily access/create/contain “wisdom”):

Last year, I published my top ten trends in health care. Number Five on the list was “artificial intelligence.” Specifically, I addressed the ability of IBM’s “Watson” supercomputer to revolutionize diagnosis.

Well, the folks at Memorial Sloan-Kettering have now hired Watson. If you’re in the healthcare industry, I can’t encourage you strongly enough to watch the following two-minute video because it points toward the future of cancer diagnosis.

As one of the physicians says in the video, “This is beyond evolutionary, this is revolutionary!” He goes on to add, “This could totally change the way we conduct medicine.”

IBM’s new mainframe aimed at assimilating “private clouds” — from arstechnica.com by
The zEC12 aims to do what “private clouds” do faster, better, and cheaper.
Excerpt:
IBM would like big enterprise customers to reconsider that whole distributed “private cloud” thing and go back to the original big data solution: mainframes. Today, IBM unveiled the zEC12, its next generation of the System Z mainframe platform. And like the Borg, IBM is hoping that companies will let the zEC12 assimilate their virtualization environments into a big, black cube.

 

Active in Cloud, Amazon reshapes computing — from The New York Times by Quentin Hardy

Excerpt:

SEATTLE — Within a few years, Amazon.com’s creative destruction of both traditional book publishing and retailing may be footnotes to the company’s larger and more secretive goal: giving anyone on the planet access to an almost unimaginable amount of computing power.

 

 

Watson turns medic: Supercomputer to diagnose disease — from newscientist.com by Jim Giles

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IBM Watson making progress to becoming a useful medical assistant for diagnosis and treatment planning — from nextbigfuture.com

A comment left on that post reads:

Physicians assistant? Forget that, this is going to become a lot of people’s primary care giver. This has the potential to change medicine radically. Especially as genomics and protenomic become cheaper and more frequently used with other diagnostic tools. Human doctors aren’t going to be able to keep up with the multi-variable calculus that medicine is becoming, Watson has a chance.

 

 

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3D printed arms

Articles about 3D printed arms:

Somewhat related:

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Augmented reality in a contact lens — from spectrum.ieee.org by Babak A. Parviz

 

 

Top 9 best augmented reality iPhone apps in 2012 — from blog.startappz.com

Excerpt:

The principle of augmented reality based iPhone apps is to use the superb multitasking and image processing capabilities provided by the iPhone. Even though the technology of augmented reality is still in an embryonic stage, these smart iPhone apps give us a small glimpse of what’s to come. Most of these apps are available at Apple’s iTunes App Store. So check out the top 9 best Augmented reality apps for iPhone in 2012 Here are some really cool iPhone apps with augmented reality features.

Canon announces mixed reality system for industrial design teams — from Core77.com

 

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50-gigapixel camera is straight out of science fiction  — from futureoftech.msnbc.msn.com

AWARE-2

David Brady / Duke University

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playtell: Storytime, Anytime.

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The Abundance Builders — from wfs.org by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler
Progress occurs when inventive people solve problems and create opportunities. Here are just a few of the breakthroughs that offer the brightest prospects for a future that leaves austerity and deprivation behind.

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HealthTap debuts paid private medical consultations via mobile device — from betakit.com

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HealthTap

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IKEA 2013 catalog has augmented reality — from augmentedblog.wordpress.com
And then some
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3D printing: The game changer — from T.Rowe Price by Hug Evans

Excerpt:

From my vantage point, 3D Printing is right up there as one of the most exciting innovations I’ve seen in the 20 years I’ve been around here. I think it’s going to change the way goods are manufactured across many industries.

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DIY holodeck gaming system to be built by university students — from thecreatorsproject.com by Kevin Holmes

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iRobot and InTouch Health announce RP-VITA Telemedicine Robot — from spectrum.ieee.org by Evan Ackerman

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New 3D Printers From 2012 — from kraftwurx.com

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The Avatar Economy– from Technology Review by Matt Beane
Are remote workers the brains inside tomorrow’s robots?

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In warehouses, Kiva’s robots do the heavy lifting – from Technology Review by Verne Kopytoff
Fast pace, low margins have online retailers looking to automation to keep up.

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This Week In Bots: Will robots cause even more human unemployment? — from FastCompany.com byKit Eaton

 

The expanding landscape of tech support opportunities — from parksassociates.com

Excerpt:

The connected home phenomenon – where products and services are linked together to share computing resources and information – is reshaping the competitive landscape among service providers, retailers, and consumer electronics companies.

The lines that defined and separated the different roles for each consumer product have blurred. No longer does a service provider remain the sole provider of communications or entertainment services. A retailer or OEM may have been the primary beneficiary of extended warranty revenues; now, some service providers are offering these plans as part of their premium tech support services. These changes are creating new opportunities to provide tech support services to consumers to help manage/support these devices in the home.

The less glamorous careers: Advice and fact — from by Stephanie Brooks — with special thanks to Kelsey Doyle for bringing this to my attention

Excerpt:

Few children tout that they want to be an accountant or a petroleum engineer when they grow up, even if the expertise required by those jobs make them amongst the highest paying careers. Rather, children have big dreams about becoming actors, artists, or writers with a little bit of fame, animal care workers, and firemen, rescuing babies from blazing houses. Such careers seem glamorous to children, as they are fraught with adventure and romanticism. However, as you get older, you realize that some of your childhood career choices are not as glamorous as they originally seemed. The pay in these career paths often leave something to be desired. It can be difficult to find a legitimate job within the field, with lower demand. Some of the jobs that once seemed heroic only seem dangerous and risky. Adult practicality sets in, steering many college students towards business, marketing, and other fruitful majors with relatively high success rates within the job world.

With the recession, new graduates flounder to find jobs, accepting positions that help them pay their bills rather than fulfill their dreams. However, there are still a brave few that pursue their childhood aspirations. These tough career paths require tremendous personal drive, a touch of luck, and in many cases, the ability to handle failure, excessive stress, and potential pay cuts. The following jobs are just a handful of the most popular career choices strived for by children. Upon further examination, many of them may not be all they’re cracked up to be.

 

Innovations in health care

A visual guide to health care innovation — from fastcoexist.com by Morgan Clendaniel
There are tons of startups looking to change how we get and stay healthy–from minimizing emergency room visits to getting your medical records on your phone. A handy and fun website, Healthy Dose of Imagination, will take you on a tour of some of the best.

 

Also see:

  • Meet the 15-year-old who is changing how we test for cancer — from — from fastcoexist.com by
    By day, Jack Andraka appears to be a normal high school student. But after school, he goes to the lab at Johns Hopkins, where he’s developing a test for pancreatic cancer that is worlds better than what’s currently available. You may have read about him before, now see him talk about his breakthrough.
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15 TED talks on the future of medicine — from MedicalBillingandCoding.org

Medical Billing 101: A practical guide — from MedicalBillingandCoding.org

The ICU gets connected — from connectedworldmag.com

Excerpt:

For most of us, when we need healthcare we go to our clinic or hospital and see a doctor. But in many parts of the world, that’s not an option. In small towns located far from urban centers, especially in developing countries, the trip to see a doctor may be next to impossible. Luckily, connected technology is making it easier for patients to gain access to healthcare remotely.

In places where healthcare is a scarce resource, technology can bring it closer to people. In India, Fortis Healthcare, www.fortishealthcare.com, is partnering with GE Healthcare, www.gehealthcare.com, to create what’s known as an eICU (electronic intensive care unit). The CritiNext eICU is being deployed in 34 ICU beds in two hospitals in India.

An Alzheimer’s warning 25 years before symptoms show — from technologyreview.com by Karen Weintraub
The rise and fall of certain proteins can indicate dementia’s onset decades before the appearance of symptoms.

MacPractice announces new iPad patient registration clipboard apps — from MarketWatch.com

Excerpt:

LINCOLN, NE, Jul 12, 2012 (MARKETWIRE via COMTEX) — MacPractice, the leading Apple developer of practice management and clinical software for doctors’ offices on Macs, iPhones and iPads, today announced the launch of MacPractice MD, DDS, DC and 20/20 Clipboard iPad Apps that will streamline patient registration and leverage the efficiency and ease of use of Apple’s innovative iPad to save time and reduce the risk of data entry errors.

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http://www.ringadoc.com

 

From DSC:
With webcams and web-based collaboration tools becoming more sophisticated all the time, I wonder how this relatively new concept/service will do…? Perhaps well, if the price and quality are right.  If it does succeed, I expect Ringalawyer.com won’t be far behind it.

 

 

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