Unlikely state is tops in tech job hiring — from TechNewsDaily by Samantha Murphy

Tech Expert

Excerpt:

A report by the TechAmerica Foundation revealed that Michigan added the most technology jobs last year, bringing in 2,700 high-tech jobs between 2009 and 2010, a nearly 2 percent increase from the year before. Michigan now boasts 155,100 technology employees.

Public school choice pushed in Michigan — from EdWeek.org by Sean Cavanagh

Excerpt:

At a time when many states are adopting controversial measures to launch or expand private school vouchers, Republicans in Michigan are taking a different direction, moving ahead with a plan that would greatly expand the menu of public school choices for students and parents.

GOP lawmakers, who control both state legislative chambers, have introduced a series of proposals that would give students more freedom to attend schools outside their districts, increase options for taking college classes while in high school, and encourage the growth of charter schools and online education offerings. (emphasis DSC)

Many of those proposals mirror the stated priorities of first-term Gov. Rick Synder, a Republican, who earlier this year called for establishing “open access to a quality education without boundaries.” He described the idea as an “any time, any place, any way, any pace” model. (emphasis DSC)

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Web site lets you compare Michigan high schools’ success — Detroit Free Press by Lori Higgins

Also see:

New Michigan School Data website introduced in August 2011

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Calvin College Students' Summer Day 2011

See what a summer day in West Michigan can offer.
Los Campesinos’ “You! Me! Dancing!” used with permission of Turnstile Music.

New ‘net price calculators’ required by law may bring sticker shock to families planning for college — from Michigan (USA)/mlive.com and Flint Journal by Beata Mostafavi

University tuition hits an ugly milestone; how can college be affordable again? — from Michigan (USA)/mlive.com by Peter Luke

Also see:

 

 

 

Custer and Calvin's new science lab -- featuring Steelcase's MediaScape product

 

Custer helped Calvin College outfit a new science lab;
above picture features one of the  possible implementations of Steelcase’s Media:Scape product

 

Custer and Calvin's new science lab -- featuring Steelcase's MediaScape product

 

Clintondale High cuts freshman failure rates with flipped classes — fromConverge.com by Tanya Roscorla (Detroit, MI, USA)

Excerpt:

In an urban school outside Detroit, more than half of freshmen failed English in fall 2009.

Along with failing classes, freshmen students got in trouble. A lot. That semester, principals at Clintondale High School dealt with 736 discipline cases for 165 students.

A year later, the scene changed.

Of 165 freshmen, only 19 percent failed English. Math classes saw similar results, going from 44 to 13 percent. And both science and social studies failure rates dropped too.

$3 billion slated for Michigan start-ups through Pure Michigan Business Connect — from metromodemedia.com

Excerpt:

The recently announced Pure Michigan Business Connect initiative promises to leverage about $3 billion in seed capital and new revenue streams for Michigan-based start-ups, thanks to some local heavy hitters stepping up to the plate.

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Open.Michigan

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(CA) A Season for Turnaround — from Conditions of Education in California by Alan Daly
…the federal government offers four ‘turnaround’ models:

  • Turnaround:
    The Local Education Agency (LEA) replaces the principal and rehires no more than 50% of the staff; gives the principal greater autonomy; and implements other prescribed and recommended strategies.
  • Restart:
    The LEA converts or closes and reopens a school under a charter school operator, charter management organization, or education management organization.
  • School closure:
    The LEA closes the school and enrolls the students in other schools in the LEA that are higher achieving.
  • Transformation:
    The LEA replaces the principal; implements rigorous staff evaluation and development; institutes comprehensive instructional reform; increases learning time; and provides greater operational flexibility and support of the school.

In California the ‘transformation’ model is the one most frequently chosen.

(NY) Layoffs would hit some schools much harder — from WSJ

(MI) Michigan orders DPS to make huge cuts – Detroit News
Bobb told to consolidate services, close half of schools to end deficit

 

 

“Teaching as a Christian Practice” Workshop: At Calvin College (Grand Rapids, MI, USA) from July 11-15, 2011

David I. Smith

David I. Smith
Director, Kuyers Institute for Christian Teaching and Learning
Professor, Department of Germanic and Asian Languages

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Our efforts to think about teaching and learning in a Christian manner have often been focused on broad philosophical questions and principles, leaving open the task of relating these to the daily work of the teacher. This workshop, to be held at Calvin College and led by David I. Smith, Director of the Kuyers Institute, will explore how a closer examination of the nature of practice can shed light on the calling of the Christian teacher and on what might be Christian about a school or classroom, not merely in terms of conveying Christian ideas but rather in terms of shared practices. Participants will study and discuss recent work on the nature of social practices and of Christian practices. We will focus on how our participation in shared practices relates to formation in the classroom, and how the choice and design of such practices relates to Christian faith.


Further information:


The Kuyers Institute will offer its Teaching as a Christian Practice summer workshop, during July 11-15, 2011, at Calvin College.

The workshop is open to P-12 educators from any subject area and to Christian faculty in higher education (especially, but not limited to, education departments). The participation fee for the workshop is $100; both graduate credit from Calvin College and Michigan SB-CEUs are available at an additional cost. Thanks to a grant from the Valparaiso Project on the Education and Formation of People in Faith, the cost of study materials and lunches during the workshop will be covered, optional graduate credit will be available at a discounted rate, and a limited number of needs-based scholarships (up to $300 each) will be available to defray accommodation and travel costs for out-of-town participants. Attendance will be limited to 20 participants.

The workshop will explore how a closer examination of the nature of practice can shed light on the relationship between faith and learning. Our efforts to think about teaching and learning in a Christian manner have often been focused on broad philosophical questions and principles, leaving open the task of relating these to the daily work of the teacher. This workshop will examine what recent discussions of Christian practices have to do with schools and classrooms: can an exploration of Christian practices help us to discern the calling of the Christian teacher and to articulate what might be Christian about a school or classroom? Together we will explore what it might mean to approach Christian teaching and learning not merely as the conveying of Christian ideas, but as a shared Christian practice. While the workshop will place a strong emphasis on practical application, an interest in thinking broadly about issues of faith and learning is a prerequisite.

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