appliness – the first digital magazine for web application developers

.

Addendum on 4/13/12:

  • Java leads programming language popularity – measured by book sales — from readwriteweb.com by Joe Brockmeier
    Excerpt:
    How do you calculate the popularity of various programming languages? The TIOBE folks try to rank programming language popularity by searching the Web. The RedMonk team pulls data from GitHub and Stack Overflow. But O’Reilly has a unique method: It measures book sales as an indicator of technology trends. By that measure, at least, Java and JavaScript come out on top. Mike Hendrickson, O’Reilly’s vice president of content strategy, has been taking a deep dive into the state of the computer book market in a series of posts beginning on March 29th. The most recent is a look specifically at programming language popularity related to sales.
Tagged with:  

HTML5 Cheat Sheet - Tags
.
HTML5 Cheat Sheet - Event Handler Attributes

.
HTML5 Cheat Sheet - Browser Support

From DSC:
Looking at the %’s for browsers overall support of HTML 5, it’s just not there yet…but it’s making progress. I’ll try to pulse-check this from time to time.
Tagged with:  

treehouse.com -- learn web design, web development, and iOS development

.

 

.

 

.

 

The Right Shade of Autumn– from Yanko Design
Advisor: Wen-Chih Chang | Designer: Liao-Hsun Chen

Excerpt:

Color Elite is…[a] combination of e-paper technology, a camera and the Internet. Together they combine to provide you the exact shade or colors you are looking for, and even help reduce the use of paper.

 

.

Tagged with:  

Defending the Generalists in the Web Design Industry — from Smashing Magazine by Paul Boag

Excerpt:

In recent years there has been a move away from generalist Web designers to specialists such as content strategists, user experience architects and front-end coders. Where once there was a single job, there are now many, with ever-narrower spheres of responsibility.

While my peers are becoming more specialized, I have stoically refused to do so, remaining a generalist. If anything, my interests have broadened, encompassing subjects such as marketing, psychology and business strategy.

This has drawn criticism from some who view generalists negatively, which is in line with some of what I am reading in the blogosphere.

Where has this negativity come from, and is it justified?

From DSC:
This is a great writeup of the pro’s and con’s, benefits and drawbacks of being a generalist in the web design industry.  My experience with web design and production is that it has been extremely difficult to keep up over this last decade — especially when one can not focus solely on web design and production in one’s daily tasks.  For example, I’ve had to redirect my resources/energies into other areas, tools, pedagogies, learning theories, trends, systems-related projects, management, etc. — leaving little time to try to keep up with advances and changes within the arenas of front-end design and back-end development. I’ve been forced to be a generalist as well — but a few levels up.    🙂

 

 

Report: The most common web browsers and browser versions today — from royal.pingdom.com

 

Browser logos

 

Excerpt from this 6/16/11 posting:

The web browser market is an ever-changing landscape. It can sometimes be rocky ground for web designers and web developers trying to make their websites and services work for all the various browser versions available out there. It’s challenging work, to say the least.

That’s why it pays to be aware of what the web browser market looks like, and stay up to date. How many are using the various browsers out there? How many are using the latest versions? Which versions are the most common? How big an audience may you be annoying if your site isn’t perfect in a specific browser version?

Those are all questions you’ll want to answer, and here is what the situation looks like right now, in June 2011, based on the traffic to more than three million websites and billions of page views.

Tagged with:  

Useful HTML-, CSS- and JavaScript Tools and Libraries –from SmashingMagazine.com

Excerpt:

Front-end development is a tricky beast. It’s not difficult to learn, but it’s quite difficult to master. There are just too many things that need to be considered; too many tweaks that might be necessary here and there; too many details to make everything just right. Luckily, developers and designers out there keep releasing useful tools and resources for all of us to learn, improve our skills and just get better at what we do. Such tools are valuable and helpful because they save our time, automate mundane tasks and hence help us focus on more important things.

Here at Smashing Magazine, we’re continuously searching for time-saving, useful HTML-, CSS- and JavaScript-resources for our readers, to make the search of these ever-growing tools easier. We hope that these tools will help you improve your skills as well as your professional workflow. A sincere thanks to all designers and developers who are featured in this round-up. We respect and appreciate your contributions to the design community.

Tagged with:  

Be aware of the light source hitting your screen — from Digital Photography Schoolby Peter West Carey

 

Which also points to:

How HTML5 will transform the online video landscape — from Mashable.com by Christina Warren

 

33 essential resources for developers & designers — from Mashable.com by Brian Anthony Hernandez

For months now, web developers and designers have flocked to Mashable to learn from and share our how-to guides, analyses, videos, lists, videos and galleries. Below, we’ve assembled 33 of our favorite resources since January and separated them into three easily digestible lists: inspiration, design and development. To keep up to date with news and resources about the topics listed below, feel free to follow Mashable‘s dev & design channel on Twitter…

Tagged with:  

Designing for the future web — from SmashingMagazine.com by James Gardner

 

Tagged with:  

Design tips — from blog.99designs.com

Tagged with:  

Dear Web Design Community, Where Have You Gone? — from SmashingMagazine.com by Vitaly Friedman

An overview of HTML5 — from Integrated Learning Services

Also see:

Voki for education
.

Originally saw this item at iLearnTechnology.com

Excerpt:

Voki is a free web tool that let’s students create personalized speaking avatars that can be used in a variety of online formats (blogs, email, direct link, social network profiles, etc.).  Now, Voki has released an exclusive education edition of their service. Voki Education has some additional features that make it even more useful for the classroom. Sharing is now easier than ever.  Students and teachers can embed their finished Voki in webpages, email, and social network profiling, they can also share using a “Voki link” which will allow students to share a simple URL to a Voki page.  Students no longer need access to a website or blog to share their Voki scene!  Voki also provides custom links for educational partners like SymbalooEdu, very handy. A new lesson plan database provides teachers with a searchable database of lesson plans that utilize Voki for learning. Teachers are encouraged to share their Voki enhanced lesson plans. In the new Teacher’s Corner, teachers and “expert” users can discuss anything related to Voki. There is even a Newbies corner with a series of discussions in Q&A format. Voki is now ad-free, this makes it an even sweeter deal for the classroom!

Tagged with:  

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!

© 2019 | Daniel Christian