Fill up on Legal Podcasts — from abovethelaw.com by Legal Talk Network
Bring productivity and entertainment to the table this Thanksgiving.

Excerpt:

If you’re looking for tips on handling stress in the profession, tune in for candid conversations about addiction and stress. Or if you’re interested in different kinds of system reform, tune in to hear about the experiences of lawyers fighting for death row and criminal justice reform. Or if you’re curious about current events, catch the funny and thoughtful takes of other legal professionals as they share their two cents. So while you sweat over the oven, pull up Legal Talk Network on your favorite podcast app and enjoy informational and engaging legal content designed with the busy lawyer in mind.

From DSC:
Podcasts are another example of tapping into the “streams of content” that are ever flowing by us.

 

Report: College leaders not confident they can beat new competition — from educationdive.com by Hallie Busta, with thanks to Ray Schroeder for posting this out on LinkedIn

Excerpt:

While they say their institutions are prepared to meet students’ changing needs, they are less confident in their ability to address new forms of competition or change how the public views higher ed.

The report comes as higher ed stares down potentially fewer traditional students, more competition online, less state funding, and concerns over public perceptions of higher ed. These pressures have made smaller public and private institutions vulnerable to consolidation and even closure.

 

How technology is helping those on the autism spectrum master the job interview — from miamiherald.com by Nancy Dahlberg, with thanks to Beth DeWilde out on LinkedIn for this resource

Excerpt:

That need is real: Nationally, some 80% of adults with autism are unemployed and most are never able to live independently. Through its programs, Dan Marino’s success rate has been impressive: Over the past four years, about 72% of its Marino Campus students have found employment.

 

 

Fully online courses are #1 requirement for many working learners — from campustechnology.com by Rhea Kelly

Excerpt:

A recent report found that four out of five working learners do some of their learning online, and more than half (53 percent) are enrolled in courses that are entirely online. In fact, 42 percent of respondents said that “offering fully online classes and coursework” was their most important factor when choosing a school for continued education.

 

FTI 2020 Trend Report for Entertainment, Media, & Technology [FTI]

 

FTI 2020 Trend Report for Entertainment, Media, & Technology — from futuretodayinstitute.com

Our 3rd annual industry report on emerging entertainment, media and technology trends is now available.

  • 157 trends
  • 28 optimistic, pragmatic and catastrophic scenarios
  • 10 non-technical primers and glossaries
  • Overview of what events to anticipate in 2020
  • Actionable insights to use within your organization

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • Synthetic media offers new opportunities and challenges.
  • Authenticating content is becoming more difficult.
  • Regulation is coming.
  • We’ve entered the post-fixed screen era.
  • Voice Search Optimization (VSO) is the new Search Engine Optimization (SEO).
  • Digital subscription models aren’t working.
  • Advancements in AI will mean greater efficiencies.

 

 

Emerging Tech Trend: Patient-Generated Health Data — from futuretodayinstitute.com — Newsletter Issue 124

Excerpt:

Near-Futures Scenarios (2023 – 2028):

Pragmatic: Big tech continues to develop apps that are either indispensably convenient, irresistibly addictive, or both, and we pay for them, not with cash, but with the data we (sometimes unwittingly) let the apps capture. But for the apps for health care and medical insurance, the stakes could literally be life-and-death. Consumers receive discounted premiums, co-pays, diagnostics and prescription fulfillment, but the data we give up in exchange leaves them more vulnerable to manipulation and invasion of privacy.

Catastrophic: Profit-driven drug makers exploit private health profiles and begin working with the Big Nine. They use data-based targeting to over prescribe patients, netting themselves billions of dollars. Big Pharma target and prey on people’s addictions, mental health predispositions and more, which, while undetectable on an individual level, take a widespread societal toll.

Optimistic: Health data enables prescient preventative care. A.I. discerns patterns within gargantuan data sets that are otherwise virtually undetectable to humans. Accurate predictive algorithms identifies complex combinations of risk factors for cancer or Parkinson’s, offers early screening and testing to high-risk patients and encourages lifestyle shifts or treatments to eliminate or delay the onset of serious diseases. A.I. and health data creates a utopia of public health. We happily relinquish our privacy for a greater societal good.

Watchlist: Amazon; Manulife Financial; GE Healthcare; Meditech; Allscripts; eClinicalWorks; Cerner; Validic; HumanAPI; Vivify; Apple; IBM; Microsoft; Qualcomm; Google; Medicare; Medicaid; national health systems; insurance companies.

 

How AI can help you be a better litigator— from law.com by Susan L. Shin
Litigators should be aware of some of the powerful AI and machine learning tools, which can quickly access and analyze large amounts of data and help us make better informed strategic decisions and improve the quality of our advocacy.

Excerpt:

Although artificial intelligence (AI) has been used in the e-discovery space for more than 10 years, AI is now capable of more complex litigation tasks, such as legal research, drafting pleadings, and predicting judicial decisions, in a fraction of the time it would take a human lawyer to do the same tasks. If AI can help lawyers and law firms more quickly process and analyze large amounts of data, and in turn, make the litigation process less expensive, faster and more efficient, why have litigators been so slow to adopt the newest technologies and capabilities? Understanding and demystifying what AI can and cannot do (i.e., it can help automate the more mundane, repetitive legal tasks and analyze large amounts of data, but it cannot negotiate, advocate, or provide sophisticated legal advice) might help litigators not fear, but rather, embrace AI as a way to access larger pools of data, make more informed strategic choices in their advocacy, and provide better and more efficient legal services to clients.

 

AI hiring could mean robot discrimination will head to courts — from news.bloomberglaw.com by Chris Opfer

  • Algorithm vendors, employers grappling with liability issues
  • EEOC already looking at artificial intelligence cases

Excerpt:

As companies turn to artificial intelligence for help making hiring and promotion decisions, contract negotiations between employers and vendors selling algorithms are being dominated by an untested legal question: Who’s liable when a robot discriminates?

The predictive strength of any algorithm is based at least in part on the information it is fed by human sources. That comes with concerns the technology could perpetuate existing biases, whether it is against people applying for jobs, home loans, or unemployment insurance.

From DSC:
Are law schools and their faculty/students keeping up with these kinds of issues? Are lawyers, judges, attorney generals, and others informed about these emerging technologies?

 
 

Welcome to the future! The future of work is… — from gettingsmart.com

Excerpt:

The future of work is here, and with it, new challenges — so what does this mean for teaching and learning? It means more contribution and young people learning how to make a difference. In our exploration of the #futureofwork, sponsored by eduInnovation and powered by Getting Smart, we dive into what’s happening, what’s coming and how schools might prepare.

 

 

 

As pressure to upskill grows, 5 models emerge — from forbes.com by Allison Dulin Salisbury

Excerpt:

The Business Roundtable made big news in August when it redefined the role of corporations to focus on not just share price, but stakeholders. According to the nearly 200 CEOS who joined the statement, making that shift requires that employers not only compensate employees fairly, and provide “important benefits,” it  “includes supporting them through training and education that help develop new skills for a rapidly changing world.”

Whatever your preferred statistics, the message is clear: Millions of American workers need new skills, and that number is only set to grow. This talent mismatch isn’t just bad for individuals, it’s a challenge to businesses’ continued productivity and growth. That makes investments that help workers build new skills, and chart a course toward economic mobility, not only mission-aligned—but a business imperative. 

In response to a growing imperative, we are experiencing a sort of renaissance at the intersection of education and corporate training.  

 

As pressure to upskill grows, 5 models emerge

 

3 ways to boost middle schoolers’ confidence in class — from edutopia.org by Phyllis Fagell
Middle school is a distinct phase, and a school counselor has ideas for how teachers can draw out their students’ best work.

Excerpt:

I heard Mara’s muffled cries from the bathroom stall and weighed my options. I could give her privacy, or tell her I knew why she was crying and offer reassurance. I decided on a hybrid approach. “I’m going to give you some space,” I told her from a few feet away. “But I’ll come back in a few minutes to check on you. If you’re worried about your presentation, I can help you. Lots of seventh graders think it’s scary.”

As I started to leave, Mara—not her real name—called out, “Wait! How did you know that’s why I’m upset?”

 

 

Microsoft wants anyone to be a developer, whether they code or not — from qz.com by Mike Murphy

Excerpt:

Computers are meant to make life easier, but the ability to actually create new functionality for them resides only with a very skilled few. Microsoft wants to make computers a bit more like automobiles—millions of people know how to operate a car, and owning one can change your life, even if comparatively few have any idea how to build an engine.

Onstage at Microsoft’s Ignite enterprise developer conference in Florida [on 11/4/19], CEO Satya Nadella announced a host of new tools aimed at making it easier for anyone to develop apps.

Earlier this year, Microsoft unveiled the Power Platform, wrapping together a set of programs it has had for a few years that allow companies to wrangle their data into understandable visualizations, and build apps using that data and Microsoft’s technologies.

 

 

Design thinking for lawyers — from lawyerist.com by Marshall Licht

Excerpt (emphasis DSC):

Let’s face it: lawyers have a pretty spotty track record where innovation is concerned. We tend toward the secure, the risk-free, the known…the precedential. We shy from things we view as risky. “New” means “untested” and “untested” means “fraught.” And fraught is a nonstarter.

This propensity toward risk aversion arguably serves our clients reasonably well in the actual delivery of legal services. But it is a two-edged sword. It can simultaneously cripple us and our ability to reimagine how we practice law or how we build our law businesses to meet our clients’ ever-evolving needs.

What is Design Thinking?
Design thinking is an ethos. An ideology. A worldview. It is also, ultimately, a perfectly replicable process aimed at applying long-established and fundamental design principles to the way we build businesses and the processes in them. It is a hands-on, user-focused way to relentlessly and incrementally innovate, sympathize, humanize, solve problems, and resolve issues. For our purposes, design thinking is how you intentionally craft your law business over time to deliver legal services simply, functionally, and beautifully.

 

A lesson in active learning — from characterlab.org
How to make difficulty desirable

Excerpt:

Recently, a group of physics professors at Harvard University ran an experiment you should know about.

There were no balls rolling down planks. No springs or pulleys, no magnets, and no electricity.

What these professors wanted to know was, how can we get students to learn more? More generally, how do people learn anything—and what gets in the way?

Years of experience suggested that students learn best when assigned hands-on laboratory activities, weekly problem sets, in-class opportunities to discuss material with fellow students, and frequent short quizzes. This active approach seemed far superior to the more traditional—and more passive—approach of sage-on-a-stage lectures.

To test their hunch, the professors randomly assigned students in introductory physics to classes using either active or passive instruction. The material was identical—only the style of teaching differed.

 

The above article reference this item:

 

Also see:

  • Normalizing struggle — by Catherine Martin Christopher
    Abstract:
    Learning lawyering skills, and becoming competent or proficient in them, is a struggle. This article is a call to action for all legal educators: We need to acknowledge that students struggle, to expect it, and to convey to students that their struggle is normal. In fact, struggle is productive — learning is hard, and lawyers learn and struggle throughout their careers. This article examines and criticizes the ways legal academia treats law students’ academic struggle as a problem, and suggests that legal educators reorient their attitudes toward struggle, forgiving and embracing student struggle, even building opportunities for struggle into the curriculum. By normalizing the fact of struggle, law schools will not only improve the wellness of their students, but also create lawyers who are better prepared to cope with the constant problem-solving required of successful lawyers.Keywords: Academic success, academic support, legal education, student support, academic struggle, successful lawyers, law school

 

Addendum on 11/12/19:

Neuroscientists have found that mistakes are helpful for brain growth and connectivity and if we are not struggling, we are not learning. Not only is struggle good for our brains but people who know about the value of struggle improve their learning potential. This knowledge would not be earth shattering if it was not for the fact that we in the Western world are trained to jump in and prevent learners from experiencing struggle.

 

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