Excerpt:

ACRL has released a new research report, “Futures Thinking for Academic Librarians: Scenarios for the Future of the Book,” to help librarians reexamine their assumptions, which may be grounded in the current e-book zeitgeist. Authored by David J. Staley, director of the Harvey Goldberg Center for Excellence in Teaching in the History Department of Ohio State University, the report is a companion to the 2010 report Staley co-authored for ACRL, “Futures Thinking for Academic Librarians: Higher Education in 2025.”

 

Scholr.ly launching search engine for academic research — from betakit.com by Justin Lee

Excerpt:

Every year, there are countless academic papers published in every discipline, and graduate students and professors are constantly trying to tap into academic research from new authors around the world. Atlanta-based startup Scholrly is trying to make searching for and identifying relevant academic research easier with its new search engine for academics. Scholrly, which is launching in early June and is currently being tested by professors at Georgia Tech, allows users to search for academic papers in disciplines including computer science and IT.

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Scholr.ly -- new search engine for academic research

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Mobile megatrends 2012 — from VisionMobile
The latest in VisionMobile’s Megatrends report series – Mobile Megatrends 2012 focuses on 9 major trends, showing how the software world is impacting the mobile business. Researched and compiled by VisionMobile.

Example trends:

 

Mobile megatrends 2012 -- from VisionMobile

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From DSC:
Reflecting on Survival Factor [from Inside Higher Ed by Kaustuv Basu]:

Let researchers research, and teachers teach — but not both.  Teaching is an art as well as a science — and learning is messy.  It takes a long time and a great deal of effort to become an effective professor (and more “hats” are being required all the time).  On the flip side, there are skills required in research that may not be related to knowing how to be an effective professor.

The problem is — at least in many cases — that students are not served when researchers try to teach as well as do their research.  These researchers  were most likely recruited because of their ability to research — not due to their ability to teach.  I realize that there could be a subset that can do both teaching and researching.  But my experience at Northwestern was that the good researchers were not the effective teachers…and I’ll bet that’s still the case today.  Why?  Because there simply isn’t enough time and energy for most people to perform both roles well.

With the price of an education continuing to increase, is this a system we want to continue?  Are these researchers trying to improve their teaching?  Are they rewarded for their teaching efforts and growth?  If not, are the students being served here? In any other industry, would this type of situation continue to exist?

As we move towards a more team-based approach to creating and delivering education, we may want to seriously consider breaking up the roles of researcher and professor — and doing so for good. 


 

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iPad Screenshot 1
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Head in the clouds? Ten free Web 2.0 tools to support faculty research — from FacultyFocus.com by G. Andrew Page, Ph.D.

Live Ink -- works for me!

From DSC:
What I take from this:

  • Allow for scanning — there’s too much information to take in when drinking from today’s firehoses!
  • Use white space
  • Be brief as possible
  • Bulleted lists can be helpful
  • Provide bolding to highlight key points/topics

I noticed McGraw-Hill is starting to incorporate this technology:

  • McGraw-Hill’s Connect platform is incorporating Live Ink, a cool technology that converts text into an easy to read cascading format.

— from SmartTech Roundup: 2012 Predictions & Digital Reading

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NEW -- Journal of Learning Spaces - Volume 1 from December 2011

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From DSC:
Alan November has spoken to these items in the past as well…nice, informative infographic that I saw at Getting Smart (via Sarah Cargill) as she discusses the infographic from HackCollege:

 

Get more out of Google
Created by: HackCollege

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The Scholarly Kitchen - What's hot and cooking in scholarly publishing

 

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Deficit Supercommittee’s failure triggers steep cuts for education and research — from The Chronicle by Kelly Field

Excerpt:

The Congressional supercommittee charged with cutting $1.2-trillion from the federal budget conceded defeat Monday, after its members reached an impasse over taxes and entitlement spending.

The panel’s failure to produce a deficit-reduction plan triggers across-the-board cuts of roughly $1-trillion in discretionary spending over nine years, starting in the 2013 fiscal year. Unless Congress finds a way around the process, the Education Department’s budget will be slashed by $3.54-billion in 2013, according to the Committee for Education Funding, an advocacy group.

While the Pell Grant program is exempt from cuts in the first year, the other student-aid programs will lose $134-million, reducing aid to at least 1.3 million students. Career, technical, and adult education will lose $136-million, affecting 1.4 million students, says the committee.

Studying teacher moves — educationnext.org by Michael Goldstein
A practitioner’s take on what is blocking the research teachers need

Excerpt (emphasis DSC):

But there is almost nothing examining the thousands of moves teachers must decide on and execute every school day. Should I ask for raised hands, or cold-call? Should I give a warning or a detention? Do I require this student to attend my afterschool help session, or make it optional? Should I spend 10 minutes grading each five-paragraph essay, 20 minutes, or just not pay attention to time and work on each until it “feels” done?

My point is simply that relative to education policy research, there is very, very little rigorous research on teacher moves. Why? Gates knows it’s more than a lack of raw cash; it’s also about someone taking responsibility for this work. “Who thinks of it [empirical research on teachers] as their business?”  he asked. “The 50 states don’t think of it that way, and schools of education are not about [this type of] research.”

I agree, but I contend there are a number of other barriers. The first is a lack of demand.

A second issue is that researchers don’t worry about teacher time. Education researchers often put forward strategies that make teachers’ lives harder, not easier. Have you ever tried to “differentiate instruction”? When policy experts give a lecture or speak publicly, do they create five different iterations for their varied audience? Probably not.

Free software models how humans move -- from Stanford

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