Top Tools for Learning 2022 [Jane Hart]

Top Tools for Learning 2022

 

Top tools for learning 2022 — from toptools4learning.com by Jane Hart

Excerpt:

In fact, it has become clear that whilst 2021 was the year of experimentation – with an explosion of tools being used as people tried out new things, 2022 has been the year of consolidation – with people reverting to their trusty old favourites. In fact, many of the tools that were knocked off their perches in 2021, have now recovered their lost ground this year.


Also somewhat relevant/see:


 

15 technical skills employers look for in 2022 — from wikijob.co.uk by Nikki Dale

Excerpts:

A technical skill is the ability to carry out a task associated with technical roles such as IT, engineering, mechanics, science or finance. A typical technical skill set might include programming, the analysis of complex figures or the use of specific tools.

Technical skills are sometimes referred to as ‘hard skills’ because you can learn how to do them and, in some cases, get qualified or at least certified.

Some technical skills employers are looking for include:

 
 

Matthew Ball on the metaverse: We’ve never seen a shift this enormous — protocol.com by Janko Roettgers
The leading metaverse theorist shares his thoughts on the sudden rise of the concept, its utility for the enterprise and what we still get wrong about the metaverse.

Excerpts:

What are the biggest misconceptions about the metaverse?
First, the idea that the metaverse is immersive virtual reality, such as an Oculus or Meta Quest. That’s an access device. It would be akin to saying the mobile internet is a smartphone.

We should think of the metaverse as perhaps changing the devices we use, the experiences, business models, protocols and behaviors that we enjoy online. But we’ll keep using smartphones, keyboards. We don’t need to do all video conferences or all calls in 3D. It’s supplements and complements, doesn’t replace everything.

Also relevant/see:

A former Amazon exec thinks Disney will win the metaverse — from protocol.com by

Excerpt:

This month, Ball is publishing his book, “The Metaverse: And How It Will Revolutionize Everything.” The work explains in detail what the metaverse is all about and which shifts in tech, business and culture need to fall into place for it to come into existence.

How will the metaverse change Hollywood? In his book, Ball argues that people tend to underestimate the changes new technologies will have on media and entertainment.

  • Instead of just seeing a movie play out in 360 degrees around us, we’ll want to be part of the movie and play a more active role.
  • One way to achieve that is through games, which have long blurred the lines between storytelling and interactivity. But Ball also predicts there will be a wide range of adjacent content experiences, from virtual Tinder dates in the “Star Wars” universe to Peloton rides through your favorite movie sets.

Addendum on 7/24/22:

Neurodiversity, Inclusion And The Metaverse — from workdesign.com by Derek McCallum

Excerpt:

Innovation in virtual and augmented reality platforms and the vast opportunities connected to the metaverse are driving innovation in nearly every industry. In the workplace, future-focused companies are increasingly exploring ways to use this nascent technology to offer workers more choices and better support for neurodiverse employees.

It would be nearly impossible to list all the challenges and opportunities associated with this technology in a single article, so I’ll keep things focused on an area that is top-of-mind right now as many of us start to make our way back into the office—the workplace. The truth is, while we can use our expertise and experience to anticipate outcomes, no one truly knows what the metaverse will become and what the wide-ranging effects will be. At the moment, the possibilities are exciting and bring to mind more questions than answers. As a principal and hands-on designer in a large, diverse practice, my hope is that we will be able to collectively harness the inherent opportunities of the metaverse to support richer, more accessible human experiences across all aspects of the built environment, and that includes the workplace.


 

Set Against a Backdrop of World Events, Tim Okamura’s Bold Portraits Emanate Commanding Energy — from thisiscolossal.com by Grace Ebert and Tim Okamura

Fire Fighter” (2021)

“Fire Fighter” (2021), oil on canvas, 60 x 76 inches


A Stunning Double Rainbow Frames a Lightning Bolt as It Strikes the Mountainous Virginia Horizon — from thisiscolossal.com

 

‘Hologram patients’ and mixed reality headsets help train UK medical students in world first — from uk.news.yahoo.com

Excerpts:

Medical students in Cambridge, England are experiencing a new way of “hands-on learning” – featuring the use of holographic patients.

Through a mixed reality training system called HoloScenarios, students at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, part of the Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, are now being trained via immersive holographic patient scenarios in a world first.

The new technology is aimed at providing a more affordable alternative to traditional immersive medical simulation training involving patient actors, which can demand a lot of resources.

Developers also hope the technology will help improve access to medical training worldwide.

 
 

17 Best Video Converter Software in 2022 (Free and Paid) — from videoproc.com by Cecilia Hwung

Excerpt:

Looking for the best video converter software? We may need a free or paid video converter for various reasons. For instance,

  • Change videos into different formats for playing on iPhone, TVs, PS4, Xbox, Mac…
  • Convert videos recorded by GoPro, DJI, iPhone, DSLR cameras, or screen captures to editing-friendly format
  • Transcode videos for sending on Discord, Pinterest, Twitter, and other social media without quality loss
  • Share the same video on different platforms with different formats for getting the best outcomes on each platform
  • Convert DVDs (including the new and 99-title DVDs) with favored chapters, subtitles, and languages

Given the fact that hundreds of paid and free video converters out there claim themselves to be powerful, fast, and easy-to-learn while giving no compromise to quality, choosing the best video converter software becomes one of the most frustrating roadblocks you may encounter.

Lucky you are here. We have carefully selected and assembled a list of the best video converter software you can get right now. Most of them are open-source and cross-platform, meaning they are completely free video file converter programs for Windows 11/10/8/7, macOS, Linux, and web.

 
 

Tech & Learning Announces Winners of Best of Show at ISTE 2022 — from techlearning.com

Excerpt:

Tech & Learning’s Best of Show Awards at ISTELive 22(opens in new tab) celebrate the products, and businesses behind each one, who are transforming education in schools around the world. Tech & Learning’s panel of judges awarded the products and solutions to exhibitors at ISTELive 22 Live who show the greatest promise to the industry, according to the U.S.’s most tech-savvy and knowledgeable educators.

“It was great to be back in person at ISTELive22 and see so many examples of innovation on the exhibit hall floor,” says Christine Weiser, content director for Tech & Learning. “Our judges chose the following winners as examples of excellence in terms of value, quality, ease of use, and versatility. Congratulations to our winners!”

 

 

5 creative ways to share your passions (with classroom ideas, too!) — from classtechtips.com by Dr. Monica Burns

Excerpt:

If we’re anything alike, there are topics you just can’t stop talking about. I am definitely guilty of being “that” person who talks about the latest piece of advice they heard on a podcast or a recipe from TikTok that they can’t wait to try out. You might also find me going on and on about how fun it was to visit a new school, a new lesson idea I want to try out, or an EdTech tool that totally changed the way I think about [fill in the blank]. In today’s blog post, I put together a list of five creative ways to share your passions. You’ll also find creative classroom ideas to go along with each one.

Some of these are part of my regular practice of sharing things I’m passionate about. Others I’ve tried a few times and loved, even if they’re not my daily, weekly, or monthly way of sharing.

Best of all… all of these ideas are ones your students can try, too.


Also relevant/see:

Liven up your lesson with a comic strip twist — from classtechtips.com by Dr. Monica Burns

 
 

Adobe—yes, Adobe—has one of the best free video-makers out there — from by Jeremy Caplan
Spark Video is best for beginners or those looking for something quick and easy.

Excerpt:

Adobe’s professional software has long struck me as unnecessarily clunky and complex. Adobe Premiere, Illustrator, Photoshop and other such apps are powerful, but daunting for beginners to learn.

So I was surprised to discover that Adobe Spark Video is one of the best free apps for making a quick slideshow-style video.

 

From DSC:
For those of you college students who are trying to determine what you enjoy doing, I wanted to pass some items along that may be helpful if you are interested in game development, film, and/or TV-related production.

Some friends recommended knowing how to use the following tools, but I realize one could dive very deep with these tools:


Excerpt from Unity.com
.
Unity can be used for games, in architecture, in automotive, and in film

Additional tip:

  • Stay within what your budget can provide. Making a film about five students on campus is doable. Making a Star Wars-type movie isn’t — unless you are making a spoof or presenting a knowingly-bad movie.

I just wanted to pass these items along.


Also relevant/see:


Addendums on 7/3/22:

 

Some learning-related tips from Eva Keiffenheim’s Learn Letter


Excerpts from Eva’s 6/15/22 letter re: learning a language — with Mathias Barra, who “has studied about 20 languages and is fluent in six”

2) The best way to mastery is by making language learning part of your life
There’s no single best way to study languages. Mathias approached every language differently.

The most important thing is to find some activities that you actually enjoy in the language. For example, you can:

  • watch a Netflix series with double subtitles with the free Language Reactor extension
  • reading a book in the language you’re learning, for example with easy readers?
  • go to radio.garden and listen to the language you’re learning
  • switch your phone settings to another language
  • write your diary in the language you’re learning

“The best way to study languages is not to limit it to study time, but to make it part of your life, for example, through exposure.”

Some tools and resources Mathias recommends:

  • iTalki offers 1-on-1 lessons in more than 150 languages
  • Journaly allows you to type a text that natives correct
  • Slowly connects you with a language tandem for writing letters
  • HiNative gets you answers from native speakers
  • Speechling helps you work on listening comprehension

See the full interview here.

And from Eva’s 6/22/22 Learn Letter:

According to this concept, there’s an optimal arousal level for task performance. The Yerkes-Dodson Law says there is an empirical relationship between stress and performance. Yerkes and Dodson discovered that the optimal arousal level depends on the complexity and difficulty of the task.

From DSC:
Reading a bit about the Yerkes-Dodson Law, I was reminded of a bad learning experience from years ago. I recall sitting in a conference room at Baxter Healthcare and I was trying to learn more about programming.  I had just been switched into a new group and my new supervisor was trying to teach me some basic items (basic to him, anyway). He was getting increasingly frustrated at me for not understanding some things. The more frustrated he got, the less I could even concentrate on what he was saying and trying to teach me. 

Along these lines, I also remember a relative trying to teach another relative some new things. Again, the more upset the “teacher” got, the less able the “learner” was able to concentrate. It didn’t end well. 

Oh…what’s that?! I’m hearing a loud “Amen!!!” coming from countless music teachers and students out there too. 

For these kinds of reasons, I want to learn more about the place of emotion in our learning ecosystems.

 
© 2022 | Daniel Christian